- - Sunday, October 2, 2011

CALIFORNIA

New law prevents cities from banning circumcision

SACRAMENTO — California’s governor has signed a bill that will prevent local governments from banning male circumcision.

Gov. Jerry Brown’s office announced Sunday that the Democrat signed AB768, a bill written in response to a ballot measure proposed in San Francisco.

Backers of a ban collected more than 7,700 signatures to put a measure on the November ballot in San Francisco to outlaw the circumcision of most male children. It was later blocked by a judge.

They had argued that circumcision is an unnecessary surgery that can lead to sexual and health problems later in life. Those against the ban say it is an important religious practice for many Jews and Muslims, and that it can reduce the risk of cancer and sexually transmitted diseases.

ILLINOIS

Survey: 1 in 10 parents don’t get kids vaccinated

CHICAGO — By age 6, children should have vaccinations against 14 diseases, in at least two dozen separate doses, the U.S. government advises. More than 1 in 10 parents reject that, refusing some shots or delaying others mainly because of safety concerns, a national survey found.

Worries about vaccine safety were common even among parents whose kids were fully vaccinated: 1 in 5 among that group said they think delaying shots is safer than the recommended schedule. The results suggest that more than 2 million infants and young children may not be fully protected against preventable diseases, including some that can be deadly or disabling.

The nationally representative online survey of roughly 750 parents of children age 6 and younger was done last year and results were released online Monday in the journal Pediatrics.

They are in line with a larger federal survey released last month, showing that at least 1 in 10 toddlers and preschoolers lagged on vaccines that included chickenpox and the measles-mumps-rubella combination shots. That survey, also for 2010, included more than 17,000 households.

The Pediatrics survey follows data reported in September show that a record number of kindergartners’ parents in California last year used a personal belief exemption to avoid vaccination requirements.

MINNESOTA

Two ethnic Somali women face jihad-funding trial

MINNEAPOLIS — One of two Minnesota women accused of funneling money to a terrorist group in Somalia allegedly told potential donors to ignore charities and focus on “the jihad” and helped finance local Somali men’s travel to their war-torn homeland to fight, prosecutors alleged in court filings.

The details hint at evidence the government claims it has against Amina Farah Ali, who is scheduled to stand trial Monday on multiple terror charges. Prosecutors said Ms. Ali, 35, and her co-defendant, 64-year-old Hawo Mohamed Hassan, were part of a “deadly pipeline” that routed money and fighters from the U.S. to Somalia.

The women, both U.S. citizens of Somali descent, were among 20 people charged in Minnesota’s long-running federal investigations into recruiting and financing for al-Shabab, a terrorist group with ties to al Qaeda. Investigators believe at least 21 men left Minnesota - home to the country’s largest Somali community - to join al-Shabab.

Though others have pleaded guilty to related charges, the women are the first to go on trial. Ms. Ali and Ms. Hassan maintain their innocence and claim they were collecting money and clothing for refugees.

NEW YORK

New 9/11 compensation fund to start taking applications

NEW YORK — The newly reopened September 11th Victim Compensation Fund of $2.8 billion will start taking applications Monday.

The fund is intended to help people who became ill after working at ground zero and others whose sicknesses can be tied to the site. Residents, workers and others can apply, including those whose claims to the first fund were denied.

The deadline for applying for help is Oct. 3, 2013, or two years from the time a person learns that a physical injury or sickness resulted from exposure to ground zero. The program will run for six years.

Congress established the fund after the 9/11 terrorist attacks. It operated for two years, giving $6 billion to victims’ families and $1 billion to the injured. Last year, Congress passed the James Zadroga 9/11 Health and Compensation Act to reopen the fund and provide additional help to people affected by the disaster and its aftermath.

The new federal law allocated $2.8 billion for compensation and $1.5 billion for medical monitoring and care.

From wire dispatches and staff reports

Copyright © 2016 The Washington Times, LLC. Click here for reprint permission.

blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Click to Read More

Click to Hide