Continued from page 1

MLB executive Joe Torre said he alerted Washington and La Russa on Tuesday that a postponement was possible.

Rain was in “every forecast we had probably for the last three days,” Torre said at a news conference. “They were all consistent there was going to be rain during the game.”

Looking at Commissioner Bud Selig, Torre asked: “Do you want to play in rain?”

During the AL championship series, a game between Detroit and the Rangers in Texas was called because of a predicted storm that never arrived. This time, it came.

Busch Stadium has had weather woes in the past. In 2006, Game 4 between Detroit and the Cardinals was called.

Rain has hovered over the majors all year with more than 50 washouts, baseball’s highest total since 1997. The bad weather actually started before opening day, as the Milwaukee Brewers and Reds worked out in snow flurries on March 31.

Wicked weather intruded earlier in this postseason, too.

The opener of the AL playoff series between Detroit and New York was halted after 1½ innings by showers that lasted all night. The game at Yankee Stadium was suspended and picked up the next day at the point when it was stopped.

The only other suspension in postseason history was that Rays-Phillies game in 2008.

Baseball began the playoffs a week earlier this year than last season, intending to have the World Series conclude before November. MLB also hoped the adjustment could help avoid a chilly finish for the championship. It was in the 40s and raw last week for Game 1.

It was in the 70s and clear at Busch Stadium on Tuesday. A perfect night to play, but it was a travel day for Texas and St. Louis.

Banged-up Texas star Josh Hamilton took the rainout in stride.

“You don’t have to get worked up, hyped up to get into game mode and then shut it down,” he said. “We know early, so we’re able to come out here, get some swings in the cage, throw a bit. And it’s smart for the pitchers, too, they don’t have to get up, get going, have a rain delay, sit down.”