Stosur upsets Williams 6-2, 6-3 in US Open final

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This sort of thing has happened before at the U.S. Open to Williams, who won the tournament in 1999, 2002 and 2008.

In the 2009 semifinals against Kim Clijsters, Williams was called for a foot-fault that set her off on a profanity-laced outburst at a line judge. Williams lost a point there, and because it came on match point, Clijsters won.

That led to an immediate $10,000 fine from the U.S. Tennis Association and later a record $82,500 fine from Grand Slam committee director Bill Babcock, who also put Williams on a “probationary period” at Grand Slam tournaments in 2010 and 2011, saying that fine could wind up doubled. The USTA said Babcock will determine whether what Williams said to Asderaki on Sunday is a “major event” that counts as a violation of that probation.

A poor call during Williams‘ 2004 U.S. Open quarterfinal loss to Jennifer Capriati was cited as a main reason for the introduction of replay technology in tennis.

“It’s just always something,” said Williams‘ mother, Oracene Price. “And it seems to happen to us.”

Because of rain during this year’s tournament, the women’s final was pushed from Saturday night to Sunday. It was preceded by a moment of silence in memory of the victims of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, “9/11/01” was painted in white next to the blue court to commemorate the 10th anniversary, and the U.S. flag atop Arthur Ashe Stadium was at half-mast.

A couple of hours before stepping on court, Williams tweeted: “My Thoughts and prayers to all who lost loved ones on 9-11. I know the entire country is with you today. I’m playing for you today.”

Stosur was playing in only her second major final _ she was the runner-up at the 2010 French Open _ while Williams was in her 17th.

“I felt like I was definitely the underdog,” Stosur said.

For all of her edges in experience, Williams was the one who started a bit shakily. She was back in action less than 18 hours after winning her semifinal over No. 1 Caroline Wozniacki on Saturday night, and Williams‘ game was sleepy.

“It was a little bit of a tough turnaround, but I don’t think it would have made a difference today,” said Williams, who said she didn’t fall asleep until after 4 a.m. “I just probably should have been lighter on my toes and move in a little faster.”

Her serve _ usually one of her top shots _ was problematic, slower and less accurate than usual: Only three of her initial 14 first serves landed in, and they hovered around 100 mph. Told she’d put 35 percent of her first serves in play during the first set, Williams replied: “Wow. That’s not so good.”

Williams pushed a backhand long to get broken and fall behind 2-1. She flubbed another backhand to lose serve and make it 5-2. When Stosur smacked a forehand winner moments later, she had taken 12 points in a row and owned the first set.

That was the first set Williams had lost in seven matches during this U.S. Open, a run that included four victories over women ranked in the top 20. She said her poor play Sunday is what made her so excited when she hit the forehand that led to all the commotion.

“It was beautiful. I hit it, like, right in the sweet spot,” Williams said. “It was a good shot, and it was the only good shot I think I hit. I was like, ‘Woo-hoo!’”

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