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Salahi leaves husband, at least temporarily

The woman who made headlines for crashing a White House party was reported missing Tuesday night by her husband but a police report Wednesday afternoon states she is safe and just needed time away from home.

Michaele Salahi "had left the residence with a good friend and was where she wanted to be," according to a statement from the Warren County Sheriff's Office. "Mrs. Salahi advised that she did not want Mr. Salahi to know where she was."

Celebrity gossip news website TMZ reports Mrs. Salahi was in Memphis, Tenn., with Neal Schon, the lead guitarist for the band Journey. A representative for Mr. Schon confirmed to TMZ the pair were together at the band's joint show with Foreigner.

Mrs. Salahi was supposed to be home in Northern Virginia on Wednesday, but the night before she had called her husband, Tareq, from an Oregon area code, police said.

Mr. Salahi, who with is wife rose to reality TV notoriety after they apparently crashed the 2009 state dinner hosted by the Obamas for Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh, issued his own statement to TMZ. It stated his wife had called him but that she might be "held under duress and forced to tell persons, including authorities she is okay."

A phone number listed to contact the family went to voicemail with a full message box. A reverse phone number and address search traced the number to the USA Polo Team.

The Salahis founded and promoted the America's Polo Cup from  2007 and 2010. It was originally billed as a prestigious polo competition held annually in the region. The club behind the match filed for bankruptcy in October.

The sheriff's office stated it would be working with the FBI to continue contact with Mrs. Salahi and her family to ensure she was safe.

The Salahis appeared before a Homeland Security Committee meeting about their attendance at the state dinner, but both invoked their Fifth Amendment rights against self-incrimination and refused to answer questions.

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