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Daily Caller: ‘Glee’s‘ Sue Sylvester to channel Bachmann

- - Thursday, September 22, 2011

'Glee's' Sue Sylvester to channel Bachmann

Villainous "Glee" cheerleading coach Sue Sylvester, portrayed by comedian Jane Lynch, will mimic conservative presidential candidate Michele Bachmann in the television show's third season.

Speaking to MSNBC host Lawrence O'Donnell on Tuesday, the evening of the show's season premiere, Miss Lynch said her intolerant, heartless, scheming character will channel the congresswoman from Minnesota, who recently said that bullying gays is "not a federal issue" and therefore doesn't warrant government intervention.

"Right now, where we stand now, I'm anti-arts," Miss Lynch said of her character, who takes a swipe at "sneaky gays" in an online clip from the show.

In the clip, Sylvester says she denies her gay intern health care. A proud lesbian in real life, Miss Lynch plays an astoundingly narrow-minded, malicious teacher in the series.

"Sneaky gays are everywhere. At the church, at the mall, picking up the meticulously dressed fastidious children from day care," Sylvester says. "And that just don't sit right with ... Sue Sylvester."

When Mr. O'Donnell asked Miss Lynch whether her character's statements reflect what Mrs. Bachmann wants to say or would say, the actress answered, "Yes."

Miss Lynch, whose character will be running for Congress with an anti-arts campaign, agreed with Mrs. O'Donnell that lots of folks out there believe such extracurricular activities should be axed.

"It almost makes it less funny because it is very, very real. ... There are people who think that," Miss Lynch said. "I guess [the 'Glee' creators] want to kind of put it out there in the light of day and say this is what some people think."

In June, "Glee" creator Ryan Murphy admitted to TV Guide that the show's second season disparaged conservatives.

"We've taken a couple jabs at the right wing this year," Mr. Murphy said.

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Former Playboy bunny lists new show's mistakes

NBC's new program "The Playboy Club" hasn't gotten off to a good start. The drama, which ranked third in its Monday time slot, has enraged the Parents Television Council as well as former Playboy bunnies.

The show, which follows the bunnies and patrons of Chicago's Playboy Club in the 1960s, features scantily clad servers dancing with customers and clients. Former bunny Marilyn Miller wrote in a note to Vanity Fair that she and her fellow bunnies were forbidden from participating in such activity.

"None of those things happened," Ms. Miller wrote. "The first thing that was incorrect was the dancing together - we never danced! The Bunnies danced together, but never with a customer. It was a rule. You couldn't dance with the keyholders. They couldn't touch you. You couldn't date them, or you'd get fired. The Bunnies enforced the rule themselves - they didn't want to get hit on all the time."

Ms. Miller, who worked in the Chicago, New York and L.A. Playboy clubs throughout the '60s, added that "The Playboy Club" could give her son the wrong idea about what his mother did for a living.

"They did a wonderful job re-creating the club physically, but everything else .... And now my son thinks some of these things happened!" Ms. Miller wrote.

According to Ms. Miller, the series incorrectly leads viewers to believe that mobsters and politicians frequented the club. The former Playboy bunny attests that such folks didn't go to the club.

"I didn't like the whole show," Ms. Miller said. "I thought it was cheap, it was degrading, it was demoralizing. It makes the Bunnies seem silly. ... Not one Bunny I know liked the show. Everyone is hoping it gets canceled."

The Parents Television Council called on TV viewers this week to hold Unilever and Chrysler/Dodge publicly accountable for supporting the show. Even before the premiere of the show, the council urged potential advertisers not to "support the glorification of the Playboy brand and the objectification of women."

"The ratings for 'The Playboy Club' speak for themselves," council President Tim Winter said in a statement. "Clearly, Americans aren't interested in tuning in to a show that amounts to little more than a chauvinistic advertisement for the Playboy brand. Advertisers should take a cue from viewers and find something else to support."

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Compiled by Laura Donovan 2011 the Daily Caller.