Paramedic details frantic scene in Jackson’s room

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LOS ANGELES (AP) - The first paramedic to reach Michael Jackson’s bedroom has told a jury that the information he received from the physician charged in the singer’s death didn’t add up.

Paramedic Richard Senneff says Dr. Conrad Murray told him that Jackson wasn’t being treated for any specific condition. The veteran paramedic says that didn’t seem right because Jackson appeared to be underweight, had a surgical cap on his head and there was an IV bag and stand nearby.

Prosecutors contend Murray repeatedly concealed from emergency personnel that he had been giving Jackson doses of the anesthetic propofol in the singer’s bedroom.

Senneff was one of four paramedics working to try to revive Jackson on June 25, 2009.

Murray, 58, has pleaded not guilty.

THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. Check back soon for further information. AP’s earlier story is below.

An executive for the maker of a medical device used by Michael Jackson’s doctor to monitor the singer told jurors on Friday that the equipment was not adequate for the continuous monitoring of patients.

The $275 fingertip device that monitors the pulse and blood oxygen levels was recovered after Jackson’s death and was being used by Dr. Conrad Murray while he was giving the singer doses of the surgical anesthetic propofol.

Prosecutors called Nonin Medical executive Bob Johnson to try to show that Murray lacked enough equipment to care for the singer during the treatments. Propofol is normally administered in hospital settings.

Johnson said the model that Murray used had no audible alarm and was not intended to be used for the continuous monitoring of patients.

Murray, 58, has pleaded not guilty to a charge of involuntary manslaughter. If convicted, Murray could face up to four years in prison and lose his medical license.

A former patient of Murray lauded Murray’s treatment of him, but testified Friday that his cardiologist became increasingly distant and hard to reach while working with Jackson.

“I felt like I was getting the best care in the world,” said Robert Russell of Las Vegas.

Russell said he couldn’t get answers about his own treatment from Murray’s office on June 25, 2009 _ the day Jackson died _ and demanded to speak to the doctor.

The doctor left him a voicemail at 11:49 a.m. Prosecutors are using records to show that Murray was on the phone in the moments before he realized Jackson was unconscious.

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