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Texas Tech President Guy Bailey in a text message confirmed that the university’s board of regents would have to waive the school’s right to pursue legal action. He also said Big 12 members were planning a conference call later Wednesday.

Texas A&M officials were disappointed.

“We are certainly pleased with the action taken last night by the presidents and chancellors of the Southeastern Conference to unanimously accept Texas A&M,” President R. Bowen Loftin said in a statement. “However, this acceptance is conditional, and we are disappointed in the threats made by one of the Big 12 member institutions to coerce Texas A&M into staying in Big 12. … These actions go against the commitment that was made by this university and the Big 12 on Sept. 2. We are working diligently to resolve any and all issues as outlined by the SEC.”

Mississippi Chancellor Dr. Dan Jones said the SEC felt the Big 12 letter offered clear legal standing.

“It’s in the hands of Texas A&M and the Big 12,” Jones said. “We’ve been clear that we’d be happy to receive them if they’re unfettered of obligations. We gathered to have a vote. We had a letter that clearly gave us legal clearance. It was frustrating to be gathered and then have things pulled out from under Texas A&M like that. We’re disappointed for Texas A&M.”

But the league doesn’t want to wage a court battle for the Aggies.

“Texas A&M is a great school, but we don’t’ want to involve ourselves in any legal action over all of that,” said David Williams, Vanderbilt’s vice chancellor for University Affairs and Athletics.

He added that “all 12 schools are together on that statement.”

Texas A&M announced last week that it planned to leave the Big 12 by July 2012 if invited to join another league. The Aggies had been unhappy with the creation of the Longhorn Network at rival Texas and have made it clear they want a higher profile and more revenue.

The SEC will also reap the revenue and extended visibility as a result of the move.

Adding Texas A&M is “a business decision,” a person familiar with the situation has told the AP previously. The person said the move gets the SEC into the Texas market.

“You know how many households there are in Texas? 8.9 million,” the person said, adding that the league had no choice but to listen when the Aggies came knocking. “Why would we want to hand that to the Pac 12 or any another conference?”

Said Tennessee coach Derek Dooley: “The landscape is changing. It’s that old saying: It’s not about the money, it’s about the amount.”

The state of Texas is also fertile recruiting ground.

“I certainly understand adding a Texas team into the conference,” LSU coach Les Miles said Wednesday. “A&M has a great historic following and is a traditional power that certainly brings the interest of Texas.”

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