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Someone utters again, “Oh my God.”

Some original recordings from 9/11 still have not been made public, including military communications, discussions among White House officials and the cockpit voice recorder from Flight 93.

Mr. Farmer listened to the cockpit voice recording during the 9/11 Commission investigation. He said it is a stirring record of the hijacking and of the passengers’ attempt to retake control of the plane before it crashed near Shanksville, Pa.

Much of the audio released Wednesday has been documented previously in hearings, lawsuits and various government reports. Mr. Farmer himself included many of the transcripts in a 2009 book, “The Ground Truth.”

But the actual voices of confused controllers and pilots underscore the chaos in the sky that morning, especially in the first minutes after the hijackers swung their airliners off course and turned off the aircrafts’ transponders, making it difficult for radar to track them.

The military learned about the hijacking of Flight 11 nine minutes before it crashed into the World Trade Center, and it never was notified about the other hijackings before those planes crashed.

“The confusion on that day is something that we sometimes forget about,” said Andrew Gimigliano, editor-in-chief of the Rutgers Law Review. “The idea that hijacked planes would be used in that manner just was not something that people were thinking about, and this is really illustrative of what the real tenor was on that morning.”

Associated Press writer Kiley Armstrong in New York contributed to this report.