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Fedoruk calls April 26, 2010 his sobriety date _ and a not a day too soon.

“Everything you put in front of me,” he said, “I did.”

Even with cocaine in his system, Fedoruk said he never failed a drug test. He also said he never took hard drugs with other NHL players.

Fedoruk entered the NHL/NHL Players’ Association Substance Abuse and Behavioral Health Program, which he knows helped save him. He truly believed the league cared about the physical and mental health of its players.

His wife, who could have bolted so many times, stuck by him. Fedoruk took a self-imposed sabbatical from the game last season and put his health and family life in order. The couple celebrated the birth of their third child, and his break made him realize how much he wanted to play again.

Fedoruk had 97 points and 1,050 penalty minutes in 545 NHL games with six teams over nine seasons. His agent let teams know Fedoruk was primed for a comeback and he signed a tryout contract with the Vancouver Canucks in August.

Assistant general manager Laurence Gilman said the Canucks did their homework and had a candid conversation with Fedoruk about his ordeal. The Canucks found a player who loved the game and had his priorities in order.

“We felt it was worth it to give this person an opportunity,” Gilman said. “If he comes to camp and performs well, and fits in with our group, he’ll have every opportunity to make our team.”

If Fedoruk makes the roster, he’ll keep throwing punches if that’s what it takes stay in the league.

“If he plays here,” Gilman said, “we expect him to play in the same manner.”

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In the weeks leading into mid-September training camp, the 32-year-old Fedoruk frequently trained at the Flyers‘ practice facility in Voorhees, N.J. Drug abuse or not, a year off for any reason can be fatal to a 30-something athlete, and Fedoruk needs all the work he can to make a team fresh off a run to the Stanley Cup finals.

He knows questions about his hockey abilities are a distant second to ones about maintaining his sobriety. Fedoruk calls it a “healthy fear” that he could relapse and vows to take the necessary steps to prevent one in Vancouver.

He wanted to share his story before camp because he’s tired of keeping secrets, and to maybe help the next Fedoruk _ and prevent the next Boogaard.

“There is help out there. There is a way out,” Fedoruk said. “It’s just getting to the point where you can say, all right, I give up. I’m done. I don’t want to fight this fight anymore.”

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