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Weber had immediate success at Illinois with players largely recruited by Self, returning to the NCAA tournament his first four seasons. That included a 37-2 record during the 2004-05 season, which ended with a 75-70 loss to North Carolina in the national championship game.

The program began to slip soon after, though, and fans who had grown accustomed to winning began to sour. The Illini had a losing record by Weber’s fifth season in charge, and despite winning 20 or more games the next three seasons, the program had faded from the national spotlight.

Weber never seemed entirely comfortable following Self at Illinois, and now he’ll be matching wits with the Jayhawks’ coach at least twice a year.

In fact, Weber had grown so tired of the comparisons to the uber-successful Self that he walked into the locker room before a game in 2003 dressed entirely in black. The quirky coach told the Illini that he was “going to throw a funeral. It’s the end of Bill Self.”

The idea was to somehow get across the message that the program had moved on.

That’s exactly what Kansas State fans are being forced to do.

Martin’s intense style and own quirks endeared him to many Kansas State fans. Of course, the winning helped _ at least 20 wins each of the past five seasons, four of them ending in NCAA tournament berths, with a trip to the regional finals with Jacob Pullen in 2010.

The school’s career scoring leader, Pullen grew up in Chicago and now plays overseas. He offered his assessment of the hiring via Twitter, even misspelling Weber’s name: “Bruce Webber didn’t think I was good enough to play at Illinois and I don’t think he is good enough to coach at Kansas State.”

Others have praised the hiring of Weber, whose strong recruiting ties to Chicago will no doubt come in handy at a school that’s forced to recruit nationally. Weber is also energetic and personable, two traits that will help as he attempts to quell a fan base wary of more change.

“Give me a chance,” Weber said. “It doesn’t matter where you go or which coach you hired, there was always going to be a question mark. There’s no doubt about that. That’s part of college sports.”