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Attorney Mario Massillamany, who is representing one of the injured audience members, said he would like to ask Rollens if fair officials had asked to delay the concert and if she had relayed that information to the band.

“The biggest thing is we got those reports, which have a timeline of what people said, and it appears that it’s different than what Kristian and Jennifer are saying in their depositions,” Massillamany said.

“I think the plot will thicken on the part of Hellen Rollens, but I think at the end of the day, she’s an employee,” said Allen, noting Rollens has not yet been deposed. “The band had the ultimate authority to say we’re not performing, and Kristian Bush admitted as much.”

Rollens‘ attorney, Kevin Kearney, did not return a phone call seeking comment. The AP was unable to locate a phone listing for Rollens in the Los Angeles area.

Allen said he released a portion of the deposition Monday because he believes Sugarland’s publicists have been releasing inaccurate press releases.

Mayer, Sugarland’s spokesman, said Rollens was still employed, but not acting as manager on the current tour. Mayer denied that the band was responsible.

“The decision to delay the show is typically left up to the venue,” so in this case, the fair, he said.

The state’s liability is limited to $5 million by state law, but state lawmakers voted in March to give an additional $6 million to the stage collapse victims.

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Charles Wilson reported from Indianapolis.