49ers Baalke still considers Gregg Williams friend

Question of the Day

Should Congress make English the official language of the U.S.?

View results

Gregg Williams has admitted to his role in overseeing the bounty system that offered Saints defenders payment for painful hits. He left New Orleans after last season _ his third with the Saints _ and was hired as defensive coordinator by the St. Louis Rams.

San Francisco cornerback Carlos Rogers insists he, like Baalke, has moved past the bounty scandal. He played for Williams with the Redskins and considers him among the top coaches he has played for.

“I don’t really look too much into it, because Gregg is one of my best coaches ever,” Rogers said. “I never experienced the bounty stuff. All the stuff I heard about, I didn’t read too much into it because for me, sitting in that locker room, he’s just an aggressive coach. He talks aggressive. The whole bounty thing is just a word that is used as a bad word but also he’s not out to hurt anybody. Everything I’ve seen him do, even when I watched clips, I’ve never seen anybody carted off. If you really want to go after somebody, it’s easy to do _ you just go hit their knee or hit whatever you want to target every time.”

Rogers has made a name for himself with the 49ers, sharing the team lead with six interceptions last season for the NFC West champions. He was re-signed to a $31.3 million, four-year contract last month.

Rogers, for one, is pulling for Williams to recover both personally and professionally. They spoke when the news initially broke about the bounties.

“That’s one of my closest friends, coaches. We’re still close,” Rogers said. “I know he regrets it. I hope he gets a second chance.”

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
Get Adobe Flash player