Unauthorized biography spills Simon Cowell secrets

continued from page 1

Question of the Day

Is it still considered bad form to talk politics during a social gathering?

View results

“He is only interested in women who are uninhibited and uncomplicated,” Bower said. “He is not interested in relationships. He’s a schoolboy.”

He is, however, generous. Bower says Cowell gave his ex-fiance Mezhgan Hussainy, a makeup artist on “American Idol,” a $5 million Beverly Hills house as a parting gift. Most of his exes have refrained from spilling the beans in the media.

While Britain’s tabloids have focused on Cowell’s sex life, Bower is more interested in the story of money and power, of “business rivalry and the skullduggery.”

At the heart of the book is Cowell’s feud with fellow svengali and former Spice Girls manager Simon Fuller. The pair fell out over the 2001 British musical talent-show, “Pop Idol,” progenitor of “American Idol.” Fuller was listed as creator of the show despite what Cowell said was a verbal agreement to split the credit.

A legal battle between the two men was settled out of court, with Fuller getting the creator credit for “Idol” _ though Bower says he found “overwhelming” evidence that Cowell played a vital role.

Bower said Cowell was “naive and humiliated by Fuller’s dexterity.”

“He didn’t understand the importance of owning a format,” Bower said. “He learnt his lesson.”

He said Cowell became “incensed” by the “created by Simon Fuller” credit on “Pop Idol” and “American Idol,” and vowed to create his own rival show.

The result was singing competition “X Factor,” which had its debut in Britain in 2004 and in the U.S. last fall. Cowell also created “Britain’s Got Talent” and executive produces its U.S. spinoff, “America's got Talent.”

Cowell’s response to the book, published in Britain on Friday, is so far unknown.

Publicist Max Clifford – who says Cowell pays him hundreds of thousands of dollars a year to keep stories out of the press – said he had advised Cowell not to speak to Bower, because it would undo years of carefully protected privacy.

“He knows it was a mistake,” Clifford said.

“For Simon, who has protected his privacy and never, ever spoken about his relationships with anybody, to suddenly be quoted about this, that and the other is to me very damaging.

“Having created an image that’s been hugely successful, to see him damage it like that is sad and disappointing,” Clifford said.

Bower, though, thinks the book’s portrait of Cowell is fairly positive.

Story Continues →

View Entire Story

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
TWT Video Picks