- The Washington Times - Tuesday, April 24, 2012

MEXICO CITY — Claims that U.S. retail giant Wal-Mart used payoffs to speed zoning and other permits in its break-neck Mexican expansion is sparking soul-searching in Mexico, where crowded government offices are the working grounds of shadowy facilitators known as “gestores.”

Front-running presidential candidate Enrique Pena Nieto told the Associated Press in an interview Monday that “there is a truly critical situation in the country.”

He said he thinks an independent anti-corruption commission is needed to root out the bribes and payoffs that many say have become as common as paying a light bill, and sometimes easier.

“This is an endemic vice, a vice that leads us nowhere,” Mr. Pena Nieto said.

According to a New York Times report, Wal-Mart executives turned to middlemen in the early 2000s to grease the way for building up the company’s Mexican subsidiary, which has become its biggest foreign operation.

Whether at least $8.5 million that apparently was paid to gestores actually wound up as bribes for corrupt local officials remains to be seen. The Times also said an additional $16 million went directly to officials.

Wal-Mart Stores Inc. says it is conducting its own investigation, and two U.S. congressmen announced they are opening a probe.

The Mexican federal government announced Monday evening that it has no jurisdiction in the case because the report referred only to the involvement of state and city officials.

Mexico’s Economy Department said there is no evidence any federal officials were involved, given that decisions on permits and zoning are handled at the municipal level, but said Mexico will cooperate with the U.S. investigations.

Many Mexicans wouldn’t be surprised if the claims are true.

A visit to any government office is likely to bring the sighting of a well-dressed man carrying reams of documents who will glide past the long lines, shake hands with the official behind the counter and get ushered into a backroom, where his affairs presumably get a fast-track service.

The suspicion is these go-betweens funnel a portion of the fees they charge clients to corrupt officials to smooth the issuance of permits, approvals and other government stamps.

In a country where laws on zoning rules, construction codes and building permits are vague or laxly enforced, the difference between opening a store quickly and having it held up for months may depend on using a gestor.

“Nobody is exempted” from the demands for bribes, said Mexico City security consultant Max Morales, who advises companies on everything from building projects to security against kidnappings. “Even the big American companies are subject to extortion.”