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“We have Jack telling the story,” Greenburg said. “It was a time period where people are just smoking and not thinking about the ramifications. It’s interesting that at 22, Jack figured out at that point that it’s not the way to act as a role model. When he saw that film, he was taken aback.”

Greenburg had much more to work with for the project. In collaboration with the USGA Museum, he shows early footage of Nicklaus as the prodigy who won the 1959 U.S. Amateur and nearly won the U.S. Open a year later at Cherry Hills until he shot 39 on the back and Palmer charged home with a 65 to beat him and Ben Hogan.

There are interviews with Dow Finsterwald, Gary Player and Billy Maxwell, who played the final two rounds of regulation on Saturday with Nicklaus, along with journalists Dave Anderson and Marino Parascenzo, who covered the 1962 U.S. Open.

He also spoke with Nicklaus and Palmer. It was supposed to be a one-hour interview. Both gave him two hours of their time.

“The rich tradition of these championships really speaks to building the brand that is the USGA,” Greenburg said. “At the end of the day, this championship is measured through its past. Every year is a building block to what the U.S. Open stands for, and there’s no better way to celebrate the U.S. Open.”