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The roles are reversed early in this Baltic QGD, as it is Black who tries to punish White for an early pawn snatch after 5. Bd2 dxc4 6. Qxb7. Gareev coolly castles long - right into the Black attack - and does not panic when his older opponent throws the tactical kitchen sink his way.

Thus: 12. Qa4 Rxb2!? (trying to change the dynamic of the position and confuse his young opponent, but this move fails on both counts; White was threatening to roll up the board with 13. e4 Bg6 14. Bg5 Qc5 15. Be3 Rb4 16. Qa6 and Black’s position collapses) 13. Bc3! (the correct reply 13. Kxb2? Qd4+ 14. Bc3 [Kc1?? Bxa3+ 15. Qxa3 Qa1 mate] Bxa3+ 15. Qxa3 Qxd1 is great for Black) Rd2?! (Stripunsky can hardly retreat now, but White finds a forced path to a winning advantage) 14. Qa8+! (Rxd2?! and not 14. Bxd2?? Qxa3+ 15. Qxa3 Bxa3 mate Qxa3+ 15. Qxa3 Bxa3+ 16. Kd1 e5, and Black can at least fight on) Nd8 15. Rxd2 Qxa3+ 16. Qxa3 Bxa3+ 17. Kd1 e5 18. e4 Be6 19. Bxe5, and White has a decisive edge both positionally and in material.

At the end, after 22. Bd6 Ra8 23. Bxa3 Rxa3 24. Rd6, Black must lose another piece; Stripunsky resigned.

Cherednichenko-Cabarkapa, European Individual Championship, March 2012

1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 g6 3. Nbd2 d5 4. e3 Bg7 5. b4 O-O 6. Bb2 a5 7. b5 a4 8. Ba3 Re8 9. Rc1 Ne4 10. Nxe4 dxe4 11. Nd2 e5 12. c3 Be6 13. Nc4 exd4 14. cxd4 Qg5 15. Nb2 Bxa2 16. Rxc7 Nc6 17. Rxb7 Nxd4 18. exd4 e3 19. f3 e2 20. Bxe2 Qxg2 21. Rf1 Bxd4 22. Bb4 Bxb2 23. Qd2 Rad8 24. Qxb2 Bb3 25. Re7 Rxe7 26. Bxe7 Rd1+ 27. Bxd1 Qxb2 28. Bxb3 axb3 29. Bb4 Qc1+ 30. Ke2 Qxf1+ White resigns.

Gareev-Stripunsky, World Open, July 2009

1. d4 d5 2. Nf3 Bf5 3. c4 e6 4. Qb3 Nc6 5. Bd2 dxc4 6. Qxb7 Nge7 7. Qa6 Rb8 8. Na3 Nxd4 9. O-O-O Nxf3 10. gxf3 Qd6 11. Qxa7 Nc6 12. Qa4 Rxb2 13. Bc3 Rd2 14. Qa8+ Nd8 15. Rxd2 Qxa3+ 16. Qxa3 Bxa3+ 17. Kd1 e5 18. e4 Be6 19. Bxe5 O-O 20. Rg1 f6 21. Bxc7 Nc6 22. Bd6 Ra8 23. Bxa3 Rxa3 24. Rd6 Black resigns.

• David R. Sands can be reached at 202/636-3178 or by email at dsands@washingtontimes.com.