- Associated Press - Wednesday, April 4, 2012

OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — Civic and religious leaders pleaded for an end to violence in Oakland after seven people were gunned down at a small Christian college by a suspect who police say was angry about being expelled and teased for his poor English skills.

Several hundred friends, family and community members gathered for a multicultural prayer vigil Tuesday night to mourn the victims of the nation’s biggest campus shooting since the 2007 Virginia Tech massacre.

Six students and a receptionist were killed and three others were wounded when the gunman went on a shooting rampage Monday morning at Oikos University, an Oakland school founded to help Korean immigrants adjust to life in America and launch new careers.

“Only God knows the meaning of the suffering we endure,” Dr. Woo Nam Soo, the university’s vice president, said in Korean during the church service. “In this unbearable tragedy and suffering, only God can create something good out of it.”

Shortly after the deadly shooting spree, police arrested 43-year-old nursing student One Goh at a supermarket a few miles from campus.

The South Korea native is being held without bail on suspicion of seven counts of murder, three counts of attempted murder and other charges. He is expected to make his first court appearance Wednesday afternoon.

Since his arrest, emerging details of Goh’s life suggest a troubled man who has been struggling to deal with personal and family difficulties over the past decade.

Romie John Delariman, an Oikos nursing instructor who knew the suspect and victims, said Goh got good grades, but he used to boast about violence and told a story about beating someone up who tried to mug him in San Francisco.

“I don’t know if you could call it mentally unstable, but sometimes he would brag that he was capable of hurting people,” Delariman said in an interview with The Associated Press.

Delariman said Goh was one of his most eager students, but he felt disrespected by his younger classmates.

“He said he was too old to go school with all the young people, and he said all his classmates were mean to him,” Delariman said.

Police have released little background information about Goh, other than to say he had become a U.S. citizen.

Though records list an Oakland address for Goh in 2004, he lived for most of the decade in Virginia, where a mentally ill student fatally shot 32 people at Virginia Tech before turning the gun on himself.

Next-door neighbors in Gloucester County recalled him as being very quiet, but said he would speak if they spoke first. Goh kept to himself to the point that neighbor Thomas Lumpkin, 70, never learned Goh’s name.

“He was always well-dressed, nicely shaved, and his hair nicely cut,” he said.

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