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It took about two hours to clear up the confusion.

“This place, if you are a little bit off, it can eat you up,” Donald said.

Donald and Westwood are the only two players to be No. 1 without ever having won a major. Westwood is atop the list of the best who have never won a Grand Slam event _ 36 wins around the world, formerly No. 1 in the world and a half-dozen close calls in the majors, including a runner-up finish at the Masters two years ago.

“I’ve come close,” Westwood said. “I’ve won all there is to win other than a major championship. That’s my primary focus and it’s been a long time coming around since the PGA last year.”

Westwood made his move on the front nine when he ran off four straight birdies, all of them inside 10 feet, including a difficult pitch from short of the par-5 eighth green that settled within tap-in range.

Despite the soft conditions from storms earlier in the week, the scoring wasn’t as low as some thought. Westwood’s caddie, Billy Foster, walked the course earlier in the day and sent back a scouting report.

“Billy had sent me a text saying that the pins were tough,” Westwood said. “He used slightly more flowering language than that, but we’ll stick to tough. So I knew it was a day for patience.”

Stenson celebrated his 36th birthday with a 31 on the front nine, including eagles on both par 5s, and he was the only player to reach 6-under par during the round. It just didn’t last.

He hooked his drive into the trees on the 18th, took two shots to get back to the fairway, sent a wedge over the green and took four shots to get down from there. He wound up with a quadruple-bogey 8 _ known as a “snowman” in golf vernacular _ which matched the highest score on the 18th hole in Masters history.

That dropped him to a 71, not bad considering his last two opening rounds at Augusta were an 80 and an 83, but still not what he wanted.

“You make a little mistake, and then you compound it with another one, and it just keeps on snowballing,” Stenson said. “And I got the snowman in the end. What to do?”

Paul Lawrie made two eagles on the back nine to join the group at 69 that included Miguel Angel Jimenez, Edoardo Molinari, Ben Crane and Jason Dufner, who lost in a playoff at the PGA Championship last summer.

Only nine players managed to break 70, and the scoring was so bunched that only eight of the 96 players were 10 shots behind, the measure for making the cut on Friday.

“There’s still a lot of world class players there and a lot of them playing well, and majors are hard to win as it is,” Westwood said. “I’m going to have to play as good, if not better, than I did today to carry on in the position I’m in.”

Woods had an inkling of what to expect. He was on his way to the putting green when he ducked into the clubhouse, glanced at the computer and was surprised to see so few birdies. Once he teed off, it all made sense.

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