Continued from page 1

Forced into a playoff when neither could make a birdie on 18, Oosthuizen headed toward the putting green after signing his card only to find it had been taken over for the green jacket ceremony. Security led him back through the clubhouse, where a group of fans greeted him with applause.

Not so fast.

Beginning on 18, Oosthuizen thought he had it won on the first playoff hole. His approach from 150 yards out curled down and stopped 15 feet from the cup. The putt looked true as it rolled but it slid along the upper edge of the cup and refused to drop.

Oosthuizen’s knees buckled, and he buried his face in his hands.

“I thought it was in. There was no way that could stop turning,” he said. “It turned the whole way, and about a foot short of the hole just stopped turning. So you know, I thought it was over by then.”

But Watson missed his birdie putt, too, and they moved on to No. 10, the second playoff hole. When Watson launched his tee shot so far right it landed behind the gallery, Oosthuizen saw another opportunity.

“And I like the tee shot on 10. So after he hit it in the trees there, I felt confident and just probably spun a bit out of it, catching it off the heel,” he said. “It just left me a lot further back than I wanted to be.”

He left himself short on his second shot, then flew the green. When Watson hooked his shot out of trouble and onto the green, Oosthuizen was all but finished.

“He must have a great feel of the game,” Oosthuizen said.