- Associated Press - Thursday, August 16, 2012

BRUCETON MILLS — It sounds as if it ought to be a drinking game: Grown men and women hurl a 2-pound cannonball as far as they can down a paved country road, each aiming to finish the 1.5-mile, chalk-line “course” with the fewest throws.

But in some circles, Irish road bowling is serious business.

Players and coaches — or players who think they’re coaches — stand in the road as a competitor pauses, studying the slope and the curves before taking a few running steps and pitching the ball underhand, releasing it just before his velocity carries him across the starting line. The ball rolls and the crowd parts, screaming, leaning, gesturing and otherwise willing the iron and steel sphere to stick to the pavement.

When the roll is good, they pump their fists and bellow cheers that echo through the forest. When it’s bad, the hurler hears silence or a few noticeably lower-volume words of encouragement.

“Irish road bowling is the greatest sport you haven’t heard of,” says Dave Powell, membership director and spokesman for the West Virginia Irish Road Bowling Association.

Road bowling is one of the oldest sports in the world, and one of the easiest and cheapest to get into. It requires no uniform and no gear, except for a 28-ounce cannonball, or “bowl,” that the West Virginia group will rent for $5 per day. Play occurs on paved road, but seldom stops traffic. The action merely resumes after vehicles pass. Only during the largest competitions are roads closed to motorists.

The sport originated in Ireland and is played primarily in five counties there - Cork, Armagh, Louth, Mayo and Wexford - where it’s known as “Irish Long Bullets.” Crowds of spectators can number in the thousands, the masses filling the road but parting magically as the bowl begins to roll. There, the game is played every night of the week and provides regular entertainment and income for gamblers, with tens of thousands of dollars routinely and legally changing hands.

Janet O'Mahoney, 42, of Boston, is the wife of two-time All-Ireland champion Florrie O’Mahoney. She’s traveled to his home country more than 20 times to watch about 150 matches, called “scores.”

The biggest counties have the best players “because they’re at it constantly,” she says, but even children under 12 compete.

“Here, obviously it’s a lot smaller, and there are less people,” she says, “but as sportsmanship goes, it’s the same.”