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Man pleads guilty to indecent exposure on Metro

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A Capitol Heights man was sentenced to four months in jail for indecent exposure on the Metro system after passengers used a website to report him.

Robert Lee Scott Jr., 48, pleaded guilty Monday to two counts of indecent exposure in Virginia that stemmed from incidents on Metro in July. He was sentenced to a year in jail on each charge, with 10 months of the sentence suspended. He was also found guilty of a count of giving false identity to a law enforcement officer and sentenced to a year in jail for that charge, with 10 months suspended. The sentences for two of the charges will run concurrently.

According to a release from Metro, transit police responded to the Reagan National Airport station on July 26 to investigate a report of a man masturbating on a train. Officers detained Mr. Scott based on witness descriptions and positive identification from other passengers. Metro said that Mr. Scott’s description and actions were similar to two open indecent exposure cases. When police questioned Mr. Scott, he was wearing a shirt with the logo of a popular restaurant chain, which matched the description of the reports — one of which was made online through Metro’s online sexual harassment reporting page.

Mr. Scott is also expected to face one count of misdemeanor sexual abuse in the District for the incident reported online, which Metro believes happened July 25 aboard a train at the Foggy Bottom station. Metro spokesman Dan Stessel said that charges should be filed in that case soon.

Metro has had its online sexual harassment reporting tool — at http://wmata.com/harassment — since March. It allows passengers to report sexual harassment incidents directly to Metro police and gives them the option to remain anonymous. Photos and videos to help investigate can be emailed to harassment@wmata.com. Mr. Stessel said the system has received 70 complaints so far, about half of which are for conduct that appears to be criminal.

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About the Author

Megan Poinski

Megan Poinski is the former deputy metro editor at The Washington Times. She has worked as a reporter, editor and web designer for more than a decade, covering mostly local, state and federal government in Ohio, Maryland and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Throughout her career, she has received reporting awards from the Scripps Howard Foundation, Capitolbeat, and Associated Press Managing ...

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