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Gov. Mary Fallin toured Luther on Saturday, hugging residents whose homes and belongings were destroyed by the fire that swept through treetops on 24 mph winds.

“It’s heartbreaking to see families that have lost so much,” Fallin said after talking with some who were milling around the still-smoking debris that had been their homes. “I gave them a hug, told them I was sorry.”

The fire burned just over 4 square miles, including an area near the Turner Turnpike, which carries Interstate 44 between Oklahoma City and Tulsa. The superhighway was briefly closed Friday.

In Creek County, county Commissioner Newt Stephens asked residents to be patient and to stay away from the flames in the northern part of the county.

On Saturday, those able to return their homes found charred timbers poking from the debris and the burned out shells of refrigerators, washers and dryers.

“It makes me feel sad,” said Victoria Landavazo, clutching a young child in her arms. “It’s all gone. All of our family pictures, everything.”

Tracy Streeper was working in Oklahoma City, about 40 miles southwest, when she learned that the flames were approaching her home. Caught in traffic, it took her a long time to return home.

She grabbed a few clothes, medicine and her three dogs and left quickly.

“Your adrenaline is running. You’re pumped up,” Streeper said. “You could just see a wall of flames coming this way. Everything was on fire.”

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Associated Press writer Ken Miller contributed to this report from Oklahoma City.