- Associated Press - Monday, August 6, 2012

CORTLAND, N.Y. — Welcome to Tebow Town, USA.

That’s what one of the handful of T-shirts devoted to Tim Tebow on sale around town proclaims this quaint spot in central New York to be.

It’s hard to argue with such a sentiment. It’s been all Tebow, all the time at New York Jets camp, and local business owners are cashing in more than ever. Fans have been flocking to the area since the Jets rolled into town July 26 — many wanting to get a glimpse of the NFL’s most popular backup quarterback.

“Oh, definitely, he’s the main attraction,” said Ajay Patel, general manager of the Days Inn in McGraw, two miles from the camp site at State University of New York at Cortland. “The last two years the Jets were here, we were busy, but it’s been double the occupancy this year. We usually don’t get this much on this side of town.”

Training camp drew about 41,000 fans to Cortland in 2010, the Jets‘ second summer there after 40 years at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y. After the Jets chose to stay at their facility in Florham Park, N.J., last summer following the NFL lockout, the team is back in Cortland and is expected to draw about 12,000 more fans than it did two years ago. Jim Dempsey, director of the Cortland County Convention and Visitors Bureau, said more than $5.8 million could be pumped into the local economy.

New York Jets quarterback Tim Tebow watches practice at NFL football training camp on Sunday, July 29, 2012, in Cortland, N.Y. (AP Photo/Bill Kostroun)
New York Jets quarterback Tim Tebow watches practice at NFL football training ... more >

“We were looking at about a 30 percent increase [in visitors], and it’ll be interesting to see if it actually works out that way,” Mr. Dempsey said. “It’s hard to say at this point, but I would definitely say we’ll see an increase because of Tim Tebow’s presence here. And it’s not only the fans, but the media. We’ve seen more media here than we ever did the previous years.”

That’s another Tebow-related effect.

The Jets are normally a big draw for the media, with the always entertaining Rex Ryan and various other stars such as Darrelle Revis, Mark Sanchez and Santonio Holmes. But ESPN set up shop in Cortland for nearly a week, broadcasting from Jets practice — complete with live look-ins of just about every move Mr. Tebow made. Of course, there was also that shirtless jog through the rain after practice last weekend that was replayed around the clock and has had tens of thousands of views on YouTube.

“It was almost like it became Jets training camp central,” Mr. Dempsey said. “‘SportsCenter’ led every day with Jets camp, and that was just unbelievable coverage for us. If you had to put a dollar amount on that type of coverage for our town, it would be astronomical, just getting our name in front of that many people.”

ESPN wasn’t alone, as media outlets swarmed to Cortland during the first few days of camp to see how the Sanchez-Tebow dynamic appeared.

With more reporters in town, that meant more people heading to local restaurants for dinner every night.

“Business has definitely been better, and it was already really good the past few summers when the Jets were here,” said Mark Braun, owner of Doug’s Fish Fry, located right around the corner from campus. “A lot of people come in because we’re labeled a Jets restaurant, but I think with Tebow here, there’s even more media and fans here.”

Doug’s Fish Fry is a Jets shrine, with memorabilia wallpapering the restaurant. Mr. Braun has been a die-hard Jets fan all his life — “ever since I saw Mark Gastineau do his sack dance, I was hooked” — and players, coaches and front-office personnel make his place a regular stop during camp. Whether it’s Ryan, Revis or any other player, Mr. Braun makes sure they all stop and sign the huge Fathead Jets helmet — he has one for each camp so far — that is on display in the restaurant for all to see.

Mr. Tebow hasn’t stopped in for fish and chips, but there are still plenty of days of camp left.

“We’ve definitely benefited from the attention Tebow is getting,” Mr. Braun said. “People want to come here to see the guy.”

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