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Fuel costs account for around 10 percent of taxi driver overheads. Over the course of a year, NV200 London Taxi drivers would spend around 50 percent less - about 700 - on fuel than TX4 drivers.*

With a focus on improving air quality in the city, the NV200 London Taxi’s Euro V engine only emits up to 139g/km of CO2, compared with 209g/km from the ‘greenest’ TX4 model. As a relevant simulation, if all of London’s licensed taxis were replaced with the NV200 London Taxi, there would be a CO2 reduction across London of 37,970 metric tons each year - the equivalent of planting 10,000 acres, or two Congestion Charge zones, of trees every 12 months.

More importantly, the harmful NOx and PM (particulate) gases on which authorities are seeking particular improvement in ‘clean air’ legislation, would be reduced by an estimated 135 metric tons and 20 metric tons per year.**

An all electric version could have an even bigger impact on London’s air quality. Having been the first car manufacturer to mass produce a 100% electric family car with its trail-blazing Nissan LEAF, Nissan could cement its place at the forefront of motoring technology with the introduction of an all-electric e-NV200 London Taxi. With running costs estimated to be around one fifth of a conventional, diesel-powered Hackney Carriage it is likely to be popular with drivers too.

Discussions with all the stakeholders will continue to try and make an e-NV200 a realistic proposition by increasing investment in charging infrastructure.

Subject to final testing, including a crash-test, the diesel-powered Nissan NV200 aims to receive full London Taxi certification later this year.

The extensive modifications to the standard NV200 ensure the model fully conforms to the regulations set in the TfL London Taxi Conditions of Fitness. These include being able to accommodate a wheelchair passenger and achieve a 25ft (7.6m) turning-circle - a legal requirement for all Hackney carriages, said to originate from the small roundabout in front of the famous Savoy Hotel on The Strand that taxis needed to round in one maneuver.

Boris Johnson, Mayor of London, said: “Improving air quality in London is one of the most important challenges I face as Mayor. Having taken the significant step of introducing the first age limit for taxis in London, I am absolutely delighted that manufacturers are stepping up to the plate and are responding to the challenge I set in my air quality strategy to reduce taxi emissions and improve efficiency. I look forward to when a fully competitive model comes to market.”

Andy Palmer, Executive Vice President of Nissan, said: “Nissan is proud to be delivering a 21st century vision for one of London’s most iconic vehicles. The ‘black cab’ is as much a part of the London landscape as Big Ben and, whilst there will always be a place for that familiar silhouette, the Nissan NV200 London Taxi focuses as much attention on its interior as the exterior - a better experience for drivers and passengers.”

He continued: “The design process for the NV200 London Taxi was exhaustive and will be further improved. In addition to ensuring drivers would be comfortable spending extended hours behind the wheel, we’ve had to consider every user for this vehicle - there are no specific customer profiles in the back of a London cab. Adults, children, business professionals, foreign visitors, disabled travellers - they’re all potential customers. We’ve even considered those who might never get inside the taxi but who will benefit from features such as the model’s lower CO2 emissions or the un-obstructing sliding doors.

“The Nissan NV200 is a global taxi, launching in the biggest and brightest cities in the world. Safe, comfortable, efficient and convenient - it’s a great step forward for providing a transport solution that is good for both its users and other city inhabitants.”