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Pearson Morgan, a freshman, was in a math class on the first floor of the science building when his instructor relayed the news in a state of shock.

“My teacher was just so sick, he said, ‘You can just leave,’” Morgan said.

Morgan walked outside his classroom to find a female student crying. He then turned to see two or three officers with assault rifles bounding up the stairs. Then, all the classrooms emptied and a crush of students carried him outside, but nobody panicked, Morgan said.

“There was a large group of students behind me,” he said. “There was a lot of confusion.”

Political science instructor Chris Henrichsen said he was showing the film “Frost/Nixon” to his Wyoming and U.S. government class when he stepped into the hall and was told a homicide had occurred on campus.

Moments later his students started getting messages about the campus lockdown on their phones.

“We locked the door and waited for further instruction,” Henrichsen said.

About two miles away, Dave Larsen said he was headed to the gym when he drove past a body in a gutter with two people standing over it, one talking on a cellphone.

Larsen lives about a block from the location of the body, a well-kept middle-class neighborhood of mostly single-story houses.

Walsh said that within minutes of the initial call, there was another report of a traumatic injury about two miles southwest of campus.

The college planned a candlelight vigil and memorial service on Tuesday.

Casper College opened in 1945 as the state’s first junior college and moved to its current site 10 years later. Wyoming has only one four-year university, the University of Wyoming in Laramie, which serves more than 13,000 students.

Casper is Wyoming’s second-largest city. Wyoming residents refer to it as the “Oil City” because it’s a hub for the state’s oil industry.

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Associated Press writers Ben Neary in Cheyenne, Matt Volz in Helena, Mont., and Dan Elliott in Denver contributed to this report.