- Associated Press - Tuesday, December 11, 2012

MILWAUKEE (AP) - When Marquette coach Terri Mitchell picked up the phone to talk with Tyler Summitt about the opening on her staff, it figured to be little more than a courtesy call.

Mitchell knew his pedigree _ who didn’t? The son of Hall of Fame coach Pat Summitt, who won eight national titles and more games than anyone else in NCAA college basketball in 38 years at Tennessee, Tyler Summitt has been around the game longer than some veteran coaches. But he was just finishing his senior year at Tennessee and, now 22, was barely older than many of the Marquette players.

Forty-five minutes later, Mitchell had asked Summitt to come to Marquette for an interview. By the end of the interview, he had the job.

“From the second I started asking him questions, he was on it. Just his philosophy, his passion,” Mitchell said. “Coming from Tennessee, watching his mom, all the national championships _ he’s embraced all that knowledge and said, `How can I translate that into Marquette being a championship program? I will bring a championship environment every day because that’s all I know.’

“He’s going to be a star in our profession.”

Tyler Summitt was hired at Marquette in April, the very day his mother stepped down at Tennessee. She had been diagnosed with early onset dementia, Alzheimer’s type, in May 2011, a month shy of her 59th birthday.

Marquette is hosting a “We Back Pat” night to raise Alzheimer’s awareness Saturday, when it hosts Toledo. Pat Summitt plans to be there.

Because Tyler Summitt is so close to his mom, leaving Knoxville wasn’t easy. But Pat Summitt remains in good health _ whenever Tyler Summitt calls, she’s usually just finishing a workout or doing one of the many memory quizzes or puzzles she has on her iPad _ and she encouraged him to go.

“She’s prepared me for this and she knows I’m prepared and she believes in me and she’s taught me so much,” Tyler Summitt said. “So it’s fun to go and be doing kind of what she’s taught me to do and doing things the right way and mentoring young athletes while she’s right there watching.

“I think a part of her philosophy is living on in me, so I hope that I can continue to make her proud.”

Basketball has been part of Tyler Summitt’s life for, well, forever. While other kids were playing video games after school, he was hanging out at Tennessee practices. Instead of going to sleepovers or parties on weekends, he was taking road trips with the Lady Vols.

Some kids might rebel, seeking as different a career path as possible. But Summitt was captivated, never once considering doing anything else with his life.

“Basketball,” he said, “is just part of me.”

He was coaching basketball camps when he was in high school, and served as a student-assistant for the Lady Vols as a freshman. A walk-on at Tennessee his last two years, he coached AAU teams in his free time. When his mom watched game film, he’d pull up a seat and watch with her.

“Eventually, he saw everything I was seeing,” Pat Summitt said in an email. “I knew he had a gift to coach.”

Story Continues →