- Associated Press - Thursday, December 13, 2012

MIAMI BEACH, Fla. (AP) — Anti-virus software founder John McAfee said Thursday that U.S. authorities have made no efforts to question him since he arrived in Miami after weeks of evading Belizean authorities who want to ask him about the death of his neighbor.

“Why would they want to question me, about what?” a tired-looking but sharply dressed Mr. McAfee said Thursday from the steps of his South Beach hotel. The multimillionaire was characteristically chatty and seemed to enjoy posing for pictures with tourists and signing autographs while talking about his two girlfriends and the alleged corruption in Belize that forced him to flee.

Mr. McAfee was deported from Guatemala after sneaking in illegally from Belize, where police want to question him in connection with the death of a U.S. expatriate who lived near him on an island off Belize’s coast. U.S officials said there was no active arrest warrant for Mr. McAfee that would justify taking him into custody.

He said he was put on a plane to Miami, where he will stay until his two girlfriends, 20-year-old Belizean Samantha Vanegas and a woman he called “Amy,” can join him.

“I had the warmest welcome of my life. The captain patted me on the shoulders and said, ‘We’re here to help you, sir, please come with us,’” Mr. McAfee told a throng of reporters camped outside his hotel Thursday.

The 67-year-old British native said he has no money and no home in the U.S. and has been getting by on cash that a Canadian friend sent him until Mr. McAfee’s property manager comes to Miami with his cash and credit cards.

If he’s reunited with the women, he said, he doesn’t know where he’ll live or how he’ll rebuild his life. Over the weekend, he said he would be happy to go to England, noting he has dual citizenship.

Mr. McAfee bristled as reporters repeatedly asked him why he won’t answer questions from officials in Belize, denying he was under investigation. He stressed that he was afraid to answer questions because dozens of officials there stormed his property, killed his dogs, handcuffed him for hours and tried to extort money. He has not been charged with a crime.

“If they didn’t want to harm me, why have they been harming my property and my dogs? Now 5 of my dogs have been killed,” said Mr. McAfee, claiming authorities shot one of his dogs in the head and raided his house eight times.

He said he had no choice but to flee because “there was a nationwide manhunt for me” and he worried he would be thrown into a cell and silenced if captured. Officials in Belize also trumped of charges against him for running a meth lab out of his home and hiring security guards without a license, he said.

“Did I kill Mr. Faull? No, let me be clear. I had absolutely nothing to do with the murder in Belize.”

He begged the State Department to expedite visas for his girlfriend. Ms. Vanegas accompanied him when he was on the run but did not come with him to the U.S.

Mr. McAfee said he faked a heart attack in Guatemala to give his lawyer enough time to file motions keeping him from returning to Belize.

“Immediately after, I got well,” he deadpanned.

Mr. McAfee’s expulsion from Guatemala marked the last chapter in a strange, monthlong odyssey to avoid police questioning about the November killing of American expatriate Gregory Viant Faull, who lived a couple of houses down from Mr. McAfee’s compound on Ambergris Caye, off Belize’s Caribbean coast.

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