Drunken-driving cases plague P.G. sheriff’s office

Three deputies under investigation

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It’s not the first time the deputy reportedly had such troubles. According to a 2010 report in The Washington Post, Deputy Gholston’s personal car was found in a ditch in the early morning hours of March 11, 2010. He failed a field sobriety test and was taken to a district police station. A Prince George’s County police sergeant at the station released Deputy Gholston to the sheriff’s internal affairs investigators without pressing charges.

Though the incident prompted an internal investigation of the sergeant, court records do not show any evidence that criminal charges were filed against the deputy.

A third sheriff’s deputy faces charges including driving while impaired by alcohol and failure to obey a stop sign. Maryland State Police stopped Deputy Titus Maurice Coleman Nov. 25 near Route 5 and the Capital Beltway. His case has not yet been adjudicated in Prince George’s County District Court.

None of the three deputies responded to phone messages requesting comment.

Aside from confirming the names of three deputies under internal investigation, the sheriff’s office declined to provide specific information on whether any additional deputies are being investigated for driving under the influence.

“I don’t think there are any others in that category,” Sheriff High said.

Ms. Withers said MADD expects the judicial system and the deputies’ agency to hold them accountable.

“I’m disappointed because they are officers from my county,” she said. “Certainly MADD definitely believes that any person should be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law if they are charged and found guilty of driving impaired.”

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