Taking Names: Film on Steve Jobs to close Sundance festival

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The first film on the life of Apple co-founder Steve Jobs since his death will debut in January at the Sundance Film Festival, organizers said.

The film “jOBS,” directed by Joshua Michael Stern, chronicles “the defining 30 years of Steve Jobs‘ life,” according to a statement Monday from the Sundance Institute. Ashton Kutcher portrays Jobs.

The film, written by Matt Whiteley, is described as “a candid, inspiring and personal portrait of the one who saw things differently,” according to Agence France-Presse.

The movie aims to tell the story of Jobs‘ life from wayward hippie to co-founder of Apple Inc. and revered creative entrepreneur.

The producers said on Twitter that “jOBS” will be the closing film at Sundance, which takes place Jan. 17 through 27 in Park City, Salt Lake City, Ogden and Sundance, Utah.

Joining Mr. Kutcher in the cast of “jOBS” are Dermot Mulroney, Josh Gad, Lukas Haas, J.K. Simmons and Matthew Modine.

Sony Pictures also is developing a movie about Jobs, based on the bestselling book by Walter Isaacson that was released after the Apple chief’s death. It will be scripted by “Social Network” writer Aaron Sorkin.

Jobs died on Oct. 5, 2011, at the age of 56 after a long battle with cancer.

Mike Tyson wants to take one-man show overseas

Boxing legend Mike Tyson said Monday he wants to take his one-man stage show on the road internationally, to Saudi Arabia and India and elsewhere, if they’ll let him in.

Announcing a U.S. tour of his “Undisputed Truth” show — which opened in Las Vegas in April and transferred to Broadway — the 46-year-old said being on stage gave him a “high” like drugs did during his notorious hell-raising days.

Mr. Tyson, a convicted rapist who recently was denied a New Zealand visa, said a trip to Australia last month gave him confidence in his abilities to connect with audiences in the United States and beyond.

“The Australian press, they thought I was the abominable snowman until they got to know me. They thought I was scary. … They thought I was gonna give them a knuckle sandwich like back in the old days,” he told Agence France-Presse.

But they warmed to him, he said, adding: “That gave me such overwhelming confidence in doing it.”

Asked which countries he would like to take the show to, Mr. Tyson, a convert to Islam, said: “Any one of them, I don’t really care. … Saudi Arabia. A Scandinavian tour, we can do a Philippines tour, any of them.

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