LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Erdogan’s Turkey no U.S. ally

Question of the Day

Should Congress make English the official language of the U.S.?

View results

Iran has found a willing accomplice to surreptitiously work at skirting the sanctions imposed by our rightfully agitated and fed-up world community — Turkey.

This is the same nation that has been in the news for the past couple of years for all the wrong reasons and truly deserves to be sanctioned and subjected to divestment.

In fact, this mere impotent shred of the once-dynastic Ottoman Empire and its very culpable Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan should immediately be charged with some form of international crime for violating the recently updated U.N. Security Council subsection that specifically prohibits aiding the nuclear-craving Iranian regime. Arrogantly, Turkey is a past member of the Security Council itself, so pleading ignorance to such a blatantly offensive criminal charge that involves paying the exceedingly ostracized Iran for its illegal oil supply holds no water.

Great pressure must be brought to bear on Turkey now. To start, let’s all boycott its products. As much as I once enjoyed Turkish dried figs, I have long refused to aid and abet the economy of Mr. Erdogan, a committed extremist sympathizer who, among other fits of anti-Zionist pique, audaciously took umbrage at Israel’s rightful defense of itself in recent years when he boldly backed an illegal flotilla of terrorists and left-wing jihadist wannabes trying to penetrate Israel’s boundaries. This led to the deaths of eight aboard the flotilla.

Instead of insidiously laying the blame at Israel’s feet once again, Mr. Erdogan should have been charged with being the direct cause of his unscrupulous citizens’ deaths. Whether any form of justice is applied is up to the members of the U.N. Security Council.

VICTOR REDLICK

Toronto, Ontario

© Copyright 2014 The Washington Times, LLC. Click here for reprint permission.

Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
TWT Video Picks
You Might Also Like
  • Maureen McDonnell looks on as her husband, former Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell, made a statement on Tuesday after the couple was indicted on corruption charges. (associated press)

    PRUDEN: Where have the big-time grifters gone?

  • This photo taken Jan. 9, 2014,  shows New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie gesturing as he answers a question during a news conference  at the Statehouse in Trenton.  Christie will propose extending the public school calendar and lengthening the school day in a speech he hopes will help him rebound from an apparent political payback scheme orchestrated by key aides. The early front-runner for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination will make a case Tuesday Jan. 14, 2014, that children who spend more time in school graduate better prepared academically, according to excerpts of his State of the State address obtained by The Associated Press. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

    BRUCE: Bombastic arrogance or humble determination? Chris Christie’s choice

  • ** FILE ** Secretary of State Hillary Rodham testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2013, before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing on the deadly September attack on the U.S. diplomatic mission in Benghazi, Libya, that killed Ambassador J. Chris Stevens and three other Americans. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

    PRUDEN: The question to haunt the West

  • Get Breaking Alerts