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This normally unflappable republic has been rocked by back-to-back protests following President Abdoulaye Wade’s decision to seek a third term, threatening Senegal’s reputation as one of the most mature democracies in Africa.

In choosing to run again, the 85-year-old leader is violating the term limits he himself introduced into the constitution.

Mr. Wade argues that those restrictions should not apply to him because he was elected before they went into effect. He has predicted that he will win Sunday’s poll with a crushing majority.

ISRAEL

Israel signs arms deal with Azerbaijan

JERUSALEM | Israeli defense officials on Sunday confirmed $1.6 billion in deals to sell drones as well as anti-aircraft and missile defense systems to Azerbaijan, bringing sophisticated Israeli technology to the doorstep of archenemy Iran.

The sales by state-run Israel Aerospace Industries come at a delicate time. Israel has been laboring hard to form diplomatic alliances in a region that seems to be growing increasingly hostile to the Jewish state.

Its most pressing concern is Iran’s nuclear program, and Israeli leaders have hinted broadly that they would be prepared to attack Iranian nuclear facilities if they see no other way to keep Tehran from building bombs.

Iran denies Israeli and Western claims that it seeks to develop atomic weapons, and says its disputed nuclear program is designed to produce energy and medical isotopes.

EQUATORIAL GUINEA

Activists rally against dictator’s U.N. prize

JOHANNESBURG | Human rights groups are urging UNESCO to abandon a prize named after Africa’s longest-ruling dictator, one they say could be tainted by some of the millions he allegedly has looted from oil-rich but poverty-stricken Equatorial Guinea.

The board of the U.N. agency for education, science and culture meets Monday and is expected to discuss the $3 million UNESCO-Obiang Nguema Mbasogo International Prize for Research in the Life Sciences, which it accepted in 2008.

A chorus of outrage from around the world so far has delayed a decision on the prize that activists say should be quashed definitively.

Many ask how President Teodoro Obiang Nguema can offer such a prize while thousands of his people live without electricity or a clean water supply.

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