- The Washington Times - Wednesday, January 18, 2012

News of former Prince George’s County prosecutor Glenn F. Ivey withdrawing from Maryland’s 4th Congressional District race is monumentally disappointing, but his reasons for discontinuing the run are understandable in these tough economic times (“Ivey drops out of Md. congressional race,” Web, Jan. 11).

A highly respected and well-liked public servant as well as a proven and effective leader, Mr. Ivey would have made an exemplary congressman. As state’s attorney, he recognized the critical issues that needed to be addressed, and he tackled them with determination. Domestic violence was a priority during his administration, and he understood the immediacy surrounding risk factors for victims of domestic violence.

Mr. Ivey established a domestic-violence unit within his office, staffed by an expert on domestic violence. He also reached out to the faith community with collaborative efforts to reach victims who were fearful of reporting abuse but in desperate need of help. His commitment to the fight against domestic abuse was unrelenting, and it would have continued had he reached the halls of Congress.

Mr. Ivey was a leader who engaged his staff with an open-door policy, and he always made time to listen to the concerns of employees and residents of the community. Though he had many supporters and political allies who backed his congressional run with enthusiasm and spirit, their pocketbooks were not fat enough to be able to give him the financial means he needed to blaze the congressional trail.

As he continues his professional pursuits in a prestigious downtown law firm, I know Mr. Ivey will continue to have an impact. He remains an inspirational role model.

KAREN L. BUNE

Adjunct professor

Department of Justice, Law and Society

George Mason University

Fairfax