- Associated Press - Sunday, January 22, 2012

SOUTH EDMESTON, N.Y. — Chobani is making Greek yogurt as fast as Americans are eating it.

Its plant here in upstate New York farm country already pumps out 1.5 million cases of the thick yogurt every week, and pallets are stacked four stories high in the chilled warehouse.

Greek yogurt now accounts for a quarter of the total yogurt market after a dizzying growth spurt that is especially apparent here in the heart of upstate New York. The nation’s No. 1 and No. 2 Greek yogurt brands - Chobani and Fage, respectively - are both expanding plants within 60 miles of each other, and another company is building a plant in western New York. The expansions come as the big U.S. yogurt makers are focusing on Greek products, too.

Greek yogurt is made a bit differently than the thinner product that dominated U.S. supermarket shelves for decades. The whey is strained off, leaving a creamier yogurt high in protein and low in fat.

While the quick growth has some hallmarks of a food fad - think cupcakes or bubble tea - the long-term investments point to a widespread industry belief that many Americans will continue to like their yogurt a bit richer.

“I personally do not believe that the yogurt story has started yet. I believe the yogurt story in this country is about to start,” Chobani founder Hamdi Ulukaya said. “The magnitude hasn’t started yet.”

Mr. Ulukaya has harnessed the Greek yogurt boom more successfully than anyone. In 2005, he bought an old Kraft Foods plant southeast of Syracuse with plans to make the kind of yogurt common in his home country of Turkey. He believed the standard yogurt found on many supermarket shelves “wasn’t made right.”

His company, Agro-Farma, started by making yogurt for Stonyfield Farm other companies before launching Chobani in 2007 with limited runs to stores in the New York City area.

The Chobani plant today bustles with 14 production lines mechanically squirting yogurt into plastic cups that zip down conveyor belts.

The company said production will increase from 1.5 million cases a week to more than 2 million when the current $134 million expansion is completed this year. Another $128 million Chobani plant being built 2,000 miles west in Twin Falls, Idaho, will add still more.

About 60 miles northeast, the Greek company Fage is in the early stages of doubling the capacity of its 3-year-old plant in Johnstown, N.Y., to about 160,000 tons of yogurt annually.

By multiple accounts, the seeds of the Greek yogurt boom were planted years ago through Fage imports to New York City. Fage opened its U.S plant in 2008 to keep up with growing demand. Russell Evans, Fage’s marketing director, said sales have grown on average of 50 percent a year for a decade.

“It’s going up exponentially every year,” he said. “It’s constantly expanding.”

Though often pricier, Greek yogurt is increasingly becoming a refrigerator staple as consumers seek healthy, “authentic” foods. Kate Winnebeck, a 30-year-old Rochester, N.Y., resident, likes its tanginess but said it was nutrition that initially attracted her.

“I was looking for ways to get even more protein into my diet,” she said. “I didn’t want to, at the time, eat a lot of eggs in the morning. I don’t have time for that. I work full time.”

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