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Watson said the hard part was winning a tournament.

Then again, it took some time before he could find the right one, but it was worth the wait. During an auction last week in Arizona, the three-time tour winner bought the original “General Lee 01,” the first one used in the TV series and the car that is shown jumping over a police car during the opening credits.

In a short video he posted on Twitter, Watson is seen filling the car with gas and honking the “Dixie” horn. He paid $110,000, which industry experts said was lower than expected for the winning bid.

“It worked out in my favor,” Watson said Tuesday. “I wasn’t going to go much more money than that because they were predicting a lot higher number. But, for some reason, it just fell in my lap.”

That it did. Watson usually can’t make it to the Barrett-Jackson auction, but he chose not to play the Humana Challenge last week. He was sitting at the auction, and “General Lee 01” was the first car brought out for bid.

“I almost passed out when I saw it,” he said.

Watson doesn’t plan to just admire the car in a garage.

“I’m going to drive it, honk the horn at people and all that good stuff,” he said. “It will be at Phoenix next week. It’s good enough to drive to Phoenix. But don’t tell anybody it doesn’t have any seat belts yet.”

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THE TRANSITION: Gary Woodland did most of the giving at Christmas this year, bringing family and friends to Kapalua for the start of the PGA Tour season. He also was on the receiving end of a gift that left him speechless.

His mother, Linda, assembled all the jerseys Woodland wore when he was playing on baseball and basketball teams as a teenager. She cut out the front and back of the shirts and stitched them together in a quilt large enough to cover a king-size bed.

The quilt also includes a photo of Woodland swinging the club at age 3 and mementos from his first PGA Tour win last year at The Transitions at Innisbrook, with a message at the bottom that said, “A great transition.”

Woodland was overwhelmed.

“I’ve always saved everything I had,” Woodland said. “This was pretty meaningful, the kind of thing you keep forever.”

The jerseys had different colors and different names of the teams, but the numbers never changed. Woodland wore No. 5 in baseball because his idol growing up was Kansas City Royals third baseman George Brett. For basketball, it was No. 23.

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