Another victory keeps Tebow in the spotlight

Question of the Day

Is it still considered bad form to talk politics during a social gathering?

View results

DENVER (AP) - He kneels in prayer at times when many players would be pounding their chest, and is winning with a style the experts insist cannot work for long.

Tim Tebow’s formula for success and fame is not typical for the NFL. So, is it a football miracle? Or the perfect blend of luck, timing and big plays? That’s the debate that makes the tale of the Denver Broncos quarterback one of the most compelling stories in America these days.

Hardly anyone stands on neutral ground when it comes to the purveyor of this unorthodox mix of throwing mechanics, big-time sports and devout religion, a 24-year-old Christian who is the subject of comedy skits on Saturday nights and serious sermons on Sunday mornings.

But what most people will agree on is that it’s hard to take your eyes off Tebow these days _ a man who unapologetically uses football to take his message beyond the field while also taking his team on an unexpected ride through the playoffs.

“I’m just very thankful for the platform that God has given me, and the opportunity to be a quarterback for the Denver Broncos _ what a great organization,” Tebow said after his latest shocker _ an 80-yard touchdown pass on the first play of overtime Sunday to beat Pittsburgh 29-23 in the wild-card playoffs.

The play, according to Twitter, spawned a record 9,420 tweets per second.

Not lost in that flurry was that Tebow threw for 316 yards and set an NFL playoff record by averaging 31.6 yards. That’s “316,” as in John 3:16, one of the most-often cited Bible passages for Christians, the most widely searched item on Google for much of Sunday night into Monday, and the message Tebow used to stencil into the eyeblack he wore when he played college ball at Florida.

Not that referencing the Bible or thanking God is anything new in sports. After NFL games for years, a small group of athletes gather around midfield, kneel, hold hands and pray. That devotion has been largely ignored or even criticized by media and fans.

“The thing with Tebow is that he seems more genuinely religious than most athletes, who seem to be religious to win games,” said Clifford Putney, author of the book “Muscular Christianity: Manhood and Sports in Protestant America, 1880-1920.”

That might help explain why Tebow’s gestures are not being overlooked, but part of an ever-growing sensation. It started building when he won the Heisman Trophy and two national titles at Florida, though he was steeped in strong religion well before that _ born in the Philippines to missionary parents.

More recently, he introduced mass culture to the art of “Tebowing” _ kneeling on one knee, elbow perched on the other, fist to forehead _ while chaos is erupting around him. The practice now has its own website, with pictures of people Tebowing in a research lab, in front of the Sydney Opera House, in front of the Western Wall in Jerusalem, etc.

Entertaining as all that has been, it has made fans and the media rethink the way they judge and cover their sports stars. Reporting that a player was including the Lord in his postgame analysis has long been widely thought of as trite and inappropriate, something to simply skip over when typing in the quotes.

Tebow’s five fourth-quarter comebacks and his four overtime victories _ each more improbable than the last _ and his steady, genuine, yet somehow unassuming insistence on bringing God into the conversation has forced an uncomfortable question upon those who want to make it only about what happens between the lines.

Does God really care about football?

“Not one whit,” said Joe Price, a professor in the religious studies department at Whittier College. “But does God care about people who play football? You betcha.”

Story Continues →

View Entire Story

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
Get Adobe Flash player