Jackson’s ‘mood disorder’ disclosure raises more questions

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CHICAGO — Rep. Jesse L. Jackson Jr.’s disclosure that he is suffering from a “mood disorder” still leaves many questions about his secretive medical leave and whether the Illinois congressman has satisfied mounting calls to be more open about his monthlong absence.

Just hours after Democratic leaders in Congress ratcheted up pressure on Mr. Jackson to reveal more information, his office released a brief statement from his doctor on Wednesday saying the Chicago Democrat was receiving “intensive medical treatment at a residential treatment facility for a mood disorder.”

But it offered no details about Mr. Jackson’s whereabouts or even the name of the doctor, citing federal privacy laws.

Several experts said that based on the doctor’s use of the term “mood disorder,” they believed Mr. Jackson might be suffering from depression. But the statement did not elaborate on his condition and rejected claims that the 47-year-old congressman was being treated for “alcohol or substance abuse.”

“He is responding positively to treatment and is expected to make a full recovery,” the statement said. His spokesman declined to elaborate.

When Mr. Jackson’s medical leave was first announced — two weeks after it began on June 10 — his office said he was being treated for exhaustion. Last week, his staff said his condition was worse than previously thought and required inpatient treatment, saying Mr. Jackson had been privately battling emotional problems. The office has remained mum on details.

The timing of the leave has invited scrutiny, coming as Mr. Jackson faces an ethics investigation in the U.S. House connected to imprisoned former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich. Days before Mr. Jackson’s office announced his leave, a fundraiser and family friend also involved in the probe was arrested and charged with unrelated medical fraud charges.

The Associated Press on Wednesday interviewed several physicians who didn’t have firsthand knowledge of Mr. Jackson’s condition but said the term “mood disorder” typically refers to depression or bipolar disorder, which used to be known as manic depression.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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