Houston tribute, obscenities highlight BET Awards

Question of the Day

Is it still considered bad form to talk politics during a social gathering?

View results

With all the star power at the BET Awards _ Kanye West, Jay-Z, Nicki Minaj, Beyonce and Samuel L. Jackson, to name a few _ the most stirring moment came not from a superstar, but from the mother of one.

Whitney Houston’s mother, Cissy, provided the emotional highlight of Sunday’s ceremony as she sang “Bridge Over Troubled Water” in tribute to her late daughter, leaving audience members like Beyonce and Soulja Boy in tears.

Mariah Carey opened the tribute, and her voice wavered as she told stories about Houston. She recalled the last time she saw Houston last year, and how the two laughed and gossiped together.

“I miss my friend,” Carey said. “I miss hearing her voice and laughter.”

R&B singer Monica was vocally top-notch as she sang “I Love the Lord,” a gospel song once sang by Houston; Brandy sang two upbeat Houston hits, “I Wanna Dance With Somebody” and “I’m Your Baby Tonight.” Chaka Khan blazed the stage with “I’m Every Woman,” which Houston remade. Gary Houston, Whitney’s brother, also performed; and Houston’s “Waiting to Exhale” castmates _ Angela Bassett, Lela Rochon and Loretta Devine _ also honored the singer.

But it was Cissy Houston’s soaring performance that brought the audience to their feet, and had many dabbing their eyes. The tribute came five months after Houston’s death: She died the night before the Grammy Awards of an accidental drowning complicated by heart disease and cocaine use.

As compelling as that moment was, the show was also defined by its low points: Entire segments of performances, from Nicki Minaj to Rick Ross, were muted out due to foul language and obscenities, though several vulgarities were heard on air.

It started during the opening number by West’s G.O.O.D. music group, which included Big Sean, Pusha T and 2 Chainz. There were long moments of censored silence when the rappers performed “Mercy,” though not all the offending words were bleeped out. Moments later, Jackson, the show’s host, was joined by Spike Lee as they did a comedic version of Jay-Z and West’s hit song “… In Paris,” to laughs.

“Two distinguished Morehouse men,” Lee joked after the performance, referencing the alma mater of the two.

The censor police also worked overtime when Rick Ross performed with his Maybach Music Group and during Minaj’s performance and acceptance speech for best female hip-hop artist. Minaj’s win was her third consecutive time taking the prize.

“I really, really appreciate BET for keeping this category alive, and I appreciate all the female rappers doing their thing, past, present and future,” she said, before uttering an obscenity.

Best gospel winner Yolanda Adams, who also performed, gently took some of her peers to task, urging them to act mature and use their fame wisely.

“We need all of y’all,” she said onstage. “I’m saying the world needs everyone in this room. Please make sure that you use your gift responsibly, `cause we’re watching. Our babies are watching, and they want to be like us.”

West, the most nominated act of the night with seven, and Jay-Z won the ceremony’s top prize, earning video of the year for “Otis.” They also won best group.

Beyonce was the second most nominated act with six. She won video director of the year (along with Alan Ferguson) and best female R&B artist and thanked the genre and her female influences.

Story Continues →

View Entire Story

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
TWT Video Picks