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_Of course, Van de Velde’s collapse on the 72nd hole of the 1999 British Open is one all others are measured by. The Frenchman had the claret jug in the bag, going to the 72nd hole with a three-shot lead. Instead of playing it safe, he pulled out the driver and knocked his tee shot into the thick rough at Carnoustie. Then he hit it off a grandstand. Then a burn. After briefly considering a whack out of a creek, he took a drop. His now fifth shot went in a bunker, and he needed a testy up-and-down for triple-bogey just to get in a playoff. Alas, he was defeated by Paul Lawrie. Like Sneed, Van de Velde never came close again.

_For pure shock value, it’s hard to beat Arnold Palmer throwing away the 1966 U.S. Open at Olympic Club. The game’s most popular player started the final round with a three-shot lead, and stretched it to seven at the turn. Billy Casper played brilliantly on the back nine, but Palmer was still ahead by five going to the 15th. That’s when it all fell apart. Casper birdied the next two holes. Palmer bogeyed them. Palmer made his third straight bogey at the 17th, and the lead was gone. Even though he made par at 18 to force a playoff, Casper prevailed the following day. Palmer would never get his eighth major title.

_Then there’s the Mickelson stunner at the 2006 U.S. Open. Lefty threw away a chance to win his third straight major with a staggering display of errant swings and ditzy decisions. He struggled all day to control his driver, but kept pulling it out of the bag. He did it again at the 18th, needing a par to win or just a bogey to force a playoff. His drive struck a hospitality tent. He attempted to slice the next one under some trees, but caught a branch. Then he plugged one in a back bunker, leading to a double-bogey that gave the championship to Geoff Ogilvy. Lefty’s assessment afterward was priceless: “I am such an idiot.”

_Greg Norman was feeling the same way after his performance on the final day of the 1996 Masters, and there’s certainly a kinship between the Shark and Scott, who grew up idolizing his countryman. But Norman’s dismal showing in the final round at Augusta was an 18-hole effort in futility, not just a late choke job. Starting with a six-shot lead on Nick Faldo, he had thrown it away the time he made a third straight bogey at the 11th. When his tee shot at the 12th caught the bank and rolled back into Rae’s Creek, it was effectively over. The remaining holes were a coronation for Faldo, a death march for Norman. He finished with a 78, losing to Faldo by five strokes. “I let it slip away,” Norman moaned.

_Finally, let’s give a nod to Sam Snead, one of the game’s all-time greats but also remembered for squandering his two best chances to win the U.S. Open. In 1939, he could’ve won with a par on the 72nd hole but thought he needed a birdie (hey, give him a break, the scoreboard technology wasn’t what it is today). Playing aggressively, Snead made a mess of things for a triple-bogey. But 1947 might have been even worse: Snead built a two-stroke lead on Lew Worsham with three holes left in a playoff. Worsham birdied the 16th and Snead bogeyed the 17th to even things up. Then, after Worsham suddenly called for a ruling on who was away at the 18th, Snead missed a 2 1/2-foot putt. Worsham rolled in a slightly shorter one to take the victory.

And, now, Scott joins the list.


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