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Kerber was a 6-3, 6-7 (7), 7-5 winner over No. 15 Sabine Lisicki in an all-German matchup. Lisicki saved three match points in the second set, but then let a 5-3 lead slip away in the third against Kerber, also a semifinalist at last year’s U.S. Open.

Williams owns, by far, the best resume of any woman in action Tuesday. She was participating in her 33rd major quarterfinal; the other seven players have been in a total of 29.

Not surprisingly, Kvitova expects Williams to win the title.

Asked how difficult it is for anyone to beat Williams when she plays the way she did Saturday, the Czech replied: “It is big difficult.”

Impossible?

“I can’t say ‘impossible.’ She’s human,” Kvitova said.

Both played impressive grass-court tennis, hitting powerfully, serving well and returning dangerously. Williams simply was superior doing all of it.

After losing the first two points of the match, Williams buckled down and took 20 of 23 on her serve in the rest of that set. Kvitova hung tough in the second, though, yelping louder to punctuate winners. Then came a key moment, with Kvitova ahead 5-4 and Williams serving at 30-all. Kvitova whipped a cross-court backhand winner to earn her only break point of the day.

But Williams delivered a 109 mph serve, and Kvitova’s backhand return slapped against the net’s white tape. From there, Kvitova shanked a forehand off her frame, and Williams hit a volley winner after both wound up at the net.

In the next game, with Kvitova serving at 5-all, 30-love, she fell apart, making four consecutive miscues. The last, which gave Williams a break and a 6-5 lead, was the most egregious, a forehand into the net off a floated return.

That gave Williams a chance to serve it out. Did she ever. The four points she won, each serve loud on impact: 117 mph ace, 117 mph ace, 116 mph ace, 113 mph service winner.

“I loved the sound. It was really cool. I’ve never played under the roof,” Williams said. “It’s kind of like a ‘whoosh’ and a ‘pop.’ … It’s almost like a video game, but you’re playing. It kind of flies through and you hear it when it lands.”

With more rain in the forecast, the roof could be shut again Wednesday, when the men’s quarterfinals are No. 1 Novak Djokovic vs. No. 31 Florian Mayer, No. 3 Roger Federer vs. Mikhail Youzhny, No. 4 Andy Murray vs. No. 7 David Ferrer, and No. 5 Jo-Wilfried Tsonga vs. No. 27 Philipp Kohlschreiber.

While defending champion Djokovic, six-time champion Federer and Youzhny got a chance to rest Tuesday — particularly important for Federer, whose back ached during his fourth-round victory — everyone else slogged through a start-stop-start-stop afternoon of rain delays with the temperature in the low 60s.

The last two American men in the draw were beaten: 10th-seeded Mardy Fish wasted the one-set lead he built before play was suspended Monday and lost to Tsonga 4-6, 7-6 (4), 6-4, 6-4, and 126th-ranked qualifier Brian Baker’s surprising run ended against Kohlschreiber 6-1, 7-6 (4), 6-3.

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