Continued from page 2

She told the jury she had enough evidence by the end of her second meeting with the boy to determine that he had been abused by Sandusky.

Sandusky denied sexually assaulting the teen, saying that “he viewed (the boy) as an extended family member, kind of like a son,” Dershem said.

During cross-examination, defense attorney Joe Amendola asked the teen whether he had financial motives for bringing his accusations.

The teen denied that. “All I know is I’m here to tell the truth about what happened to me, just like everybody else,” he said.

Amendola pressed the accuser about his initial statements to a counselor and later the grand jury that were less detailed than later testimony.

The teen, who graduated from high school last week, responded that it was an embarrassing subject to talk about.

“I don’t believe anybody would want to talk about it,” he said.

The teen became upset as Amendola continued to ask about inconsistencies in his statements.

“It’s hard enough for me to tell these folks of the jury what happened, let alone the size of a room,” he said. “You’re asking the same questions over and over again. I’m going to give you the same answers.”

Sandusky didn’t visibly react to the teen’s account and looked straight ahead during his testimony.

Another of Sandusky’s alleged victims testified Monday, the trial’s opening day, telling jurors that the coach sent him “creepy love letters.” The man said he began showering with Sandusky in 1997 and what started out as “soap battles” quickly escalated to sexual abuse, including oral sex.

Lead prosecutor Joseph McGettigan III has described Sandusky as a “serial predator” who methodically used his youth charity, the Second Mile, to zero in on fatherless children or those with unstable home lives, buy them gifts and take advantage of them sexually.

Amendola has countered that the case is flimsy and that some of the accusers apparently intend to sue and have a financial stake in the case.