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Brodeur could only smile.

“He wanted to make sure I don’t retire,” he said. “I guess he likes beating me.”

The Conn Smythe is a fitting finish for the 26-year-old Quick, who had 35 wins, a 1.95 goals-against average, a .929 save percentage and a franchise-record 10 shutouts despite playing for the NHL’s second lowest-scoring team.

Quick has been the Kings‘ best player and backbone all season, frequently carrying them through long stretches of mediocre skating and shooting. His stellar effort was the main reason the Kings were even close to playoff position in late February, when the lowest-scoring team at the time finally awoke its slumbering offense by trading for power forward Jeff Carter, who scored two goals in the finale.

Quick earned his first All-Star berth for his steady excellence despite a stunning number of 1-0, 2-0 and 2-1 losses this season. With an offense generating consistent goals since March, he has been nearly unbeatable, going 28-8-2 since Feb. 25.

While some will note the remarkably low scoring totals across the NHL playoffs when evaluating Quick’s records, others will cite Quick as one of the main reasons for it.

Quick has better numbers than any goalie in recent playoff history _ and Quick looks nothing like most of the NHL’s best netminders. He disdains the butterfly for his own unique style, and he played it to perfection this spring.

Most hockey minds’ best comparison is Hall of Famer Terry Sawchuk, whose low-to-the-ice style is the closest thing to Quick’s agile, flexible puck-stopping strategy. He plays low and wide while his peers generally stand tall, using his aggression, anticipation and pure hustle to stop pucks.

Quick’s teammates know he’s locked in when he’s crouching nearly parallel to the ice to watch the puck through his opponents’ legs. He calls it “less style, more compete,” and he praises the technique adjustments of Kings goaltending coach Bill Ranford, another Conn Smythe winner with Edmonton in 1990.

Quick’s success has been a product of determination, because nobody expected spectacular things out of the kid from Hamden, Conn., who grew up idolizing the Rangers’ Mike Richter. One of his earliest hockey memories is being at home with friends in 1994 when Richter backstopped New York to its first title in 54 years.