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That led to one of his two bogeys, the other at No. 6 with a poor bunker shot. The only surprise was a good one — the 35-foot birdie putt on the fifth that he struck too hard and worried it might lead to a three-putt until the hole got in the way.

“Five was a fluke,” Woods said. “That putt was off the green.”

Olympic wasn’t that simple for most everyone else.

Watson was asked about his strategy of hitting his pink-painted driver. “I shot 8 over, so not very good,” he said. The next question was how he played out of the rough with short irons in his hand. “I shot 8 over, so not very good,” he said.

“You could answer these yourself,” he said.

A marine layer in the morning allowed for cool, overcast conditions that eventually gave way to sunshine. That didn’t help. Steve Marino opened with an 84. Zach Johnson didn’t feel as though he played all that badly until he signed for a 77. Padraig Harrington thought the course was fair and allowed for good scores. But he had two four-putts and a three-putt that ruined a reasonable day and gave him a 74.

“It just goes to show that firm greens scare the life out of professional golfers,” Harrington said.

Mickelson was looking forward to playing with Woods — the last time they were together, Lefty closed with a 64 and buried him at Pebble Beach in February — but he could not have envisioned a worse start. The hook was bad enough. But as Mickelson approached the gallery and looked for a crowd surrounding his ball, his eyes widened when a marshal told him, “No one heard it come down.”

Five minutes later, he was on his way back to the tee.

Mickelson made an unlikely bogey on the hole, added two more bogeys and was fighting the rest of the day.