The world No. 1 only plays for 2 days

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SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - Luke Donald doesn’t regret not coming to The Olympic Club ahead of the U.S. Open to learn the golf course.

He’s not sure how he could have applied any lesson.

Donald had a 72 on Friday and finished at 11-over 151, missing the cut for the second time in the last four majors. No other player has been at No. 1 longer than Donald without ever winning a major. He has tried playing the week before a major and taking a week off, so he’s still searching for the right formula because he said he felt uncomfortable with this swing all week.

Would course knowledge have helped?

“I’ve tried various things,” Donald said. “The problem these days when we play majors is the week before is nothing like when you get to Thursday _ even Wednesday was different to Thursday. They have a knack to get this course playing differently. When it comes to turning up on Thursday morning, it seems like a different animal. I certain don’t regret anything that I did before teeing up on Thursday.

“I just didn’t come here swinging well enough, and obviously my putter was a bit cold this week.”

If there was any consolation, Donald finally made his first birdie on his 24th hole of the tournament, and wound up with three of them. They just weren’t enough to overcome five bogeys or give himself a reasonable chance to play on the weekend.

“I think it was more a case of just not quite feeling too comfortable with the swing this week,” Donald said. “And that happens _ not just major weeks, but other weeks, too. But unfortunately at major weeks, that’s going to be magnified even more.

“I was a little off,” he said. “And that’s going to get you on a U.S. Open course.”

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KUCHAR COMMENT: Matt Kuchar made it sound as if different isn’t always better when it comes to the leaderboard at the U.S. Open.

He was asked about Jim Furyk, who had a 69 on Friday to get under par for the tournament, in context of U.S. Open players. Kuchar suggested Tiger Woods and Jack Nicklaus had done well in the U.S. Open (four titles each), in part because they hit the ball high and far.

“A guy like Lee Trevino probably would not have fared as well at the Masters or U.S. Open _ probably would fare well a lot of other places,” he said.

Trevino never won a Masters. But he did win the U.S. Open twice, once in a playoff over Nicklaus.

Asked about the high scores for some of the big names, Kuchar again offered a curious answer.

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