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“Nothing is going to be resolved, and Egypt will not see stability,” he added.

A similarly pessimistic note was echoed by another voter, accountant Yasser Gad, 45.

“The country is heading to a disaster. It will keep boiling until it explodes. No one in the country wants the former regime to rule us again,” he said.

Few voters displayed an air of celebration visible in previous post-Mubarak elections. The prevailing mood was one of deep anxiety over the future — tinged with bitterness that their “revolution” had stalled, fears that no matter who wins, street protests will erupt again, or deep suspicion that the political system was being manipulated. Moreover, there was a sense of voting fatigue.

Egyptians have gone to the polls multiple times since Mubarak’s fall on Feb. 11, 2011 — a referendum early last year, then three months of multiround parliamentary elections that began in November, and the first round of presidential elections last month.

“It’s a farce. I crossed out the names of the two candidates on my ballot paper and wrote ‘the revolution continues’,” said architect Ahmed Saad el-Deen in Cairo’s Sayedah Zeinab district, a middle-class area that is home to the shrine of a revered Muslim saint.

“I can’t vote for the one who killed my brother or the second one who danced on his dead body,” he said, alluding to Mr. Shafiq’s alleged role in the killing of protesters during last year’s uprising and claims by revolutionaries that Mr. Morsi’s Brotherhood rode the uprising to realize its own political goals.