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The case grew out of a DNA expert’s testimony that helped convict Williams of rape. The expert testified that Williams’ DNA matched a sample taken from the victim, but the expert played no role in the tests that extracted genetic evidence from the victim’s sample.

And no one from the company that performed the analysis showed up at the trial to defend it.

The court has previously ruled that defendants have the right to cross-examine the forensic analysts who prepare laboratory reports used at trial.

SAFETY

Company ordered to pay damages for firing workers

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration is ordering railroad operator Norfolk Southern to pay more than $800,000 for firing three workers after they reported injuries on the job.

Safety officials said Monday that the incidents are part of a larger pattern in which the Norfolk, Va.-based company retaliates against employees for reporting work-related injuries, creating a chilling effect in the railroad industry.

The violations of federal whistleblower laws involved a laborer in Greenville, S.C., an engineer in Louisville, Ky., and a railroad conductor based in Harrisburg, Pa.

Payments include back pay, compensatory damages and about $525,000 in punitive damages and attorneys’ fees.

Norfolk Southern spokesman Robin Chapman said the company plans to appeal all three administrative rulings.

HONORS

CIA director, NFL vet among Jefferson Awards honorees

The director of the CIA, two musicians and a former Buffalo Bills quarterback are among the people being honored with a national prize for public service that was co-founded 40 years ago by former first lady Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis.

Recipients of the 2012 Jefferson Awards will accept their honors Tuesday in Washington during a luncheon at the Hyatt Regency Hotel and at an evening celebration at Constitution Hall. Most of the 18 recipients of the awards, dubbed a “Nobel Prize” for public service, are not celebrities.

The more well-known honorees include CIA director David H. Petraeus, who led U.S. forces in Iraq and Afghanistan and became head of the CIA in 2011.

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