- Associated Press - Thursday, June 21, 2012

MONTEVIDEO, URUGUAYUruguay’s national government said Wednesday it hopes to fight a growing crime problem by selling marijuana to citizens registered to buy it, and will send a bill to Congress that would make it the first country in the world to do so.

Under the plan, only the government would be allowed to sell marijuana and only to adults who register on a government database, letting officials keep track of their purchases over time.

Defense Minister Eleuterio Fernandez Huidobro told reporters in Montevideo that the measure aims to weaken crime in the country by removing profits from drug dealers and diverting users from harder drugs.

He said the bill would be sent to Congress soon, but an exact date had not been set.

“We’re shifting toward a stricter state control of the distribution and production of this drug,” Mr. Fernandez said. “It’s a fight on both fronts: against consumption and drug trafficking. We think the prohibition of some drugs is creating more problems to society than the drug itself.”

Uruguayan newspapers have reported that money from taxes on marijuana sold by the government would go toward rehabilitating drug addicts.

The government did not provide details.

There are no laws against marijuana use in Uruguay. Possession of the drug for personal use has never been criminalized.

Media reports have said that people who use more than a limited number of marijuana cigarettes would have to undergo drug rehabilitation.

Some Uruguayans wondered how successful such a measure could be.

“People who consume are not going to buy it from the state,” said Natalia Pereira, 28, adding that she smokes marijuana occasionally. “They’re going to be [distrustful] buying it from a place where you have to register and they can typecast you.”

A debate over the move lit up social media networks in the country, with some people worried about free sales of marijuana and others joking about it.

“Legalizing marijuana is not a security measure,” one man in the capital of Uruguay wrote on his Twitter account.

“Ha, ha, ha!” joked another. “I can now imagine you going down to the kiosk to buy bread, milk and a little box of marijuana.”

The idea is to weaken crime by removing profits from drug dealers and diverting users from harder drugs.

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