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BELLEFONTE — Jerry Sandusky wants “people to know that he’s not guilty,” an attorney for the retired Penn State assistant football coach said Monday.

Sandusky, once considered Hall of Fame coach Joe Paterno’s heir apparent, was convicted Friday of 45 counts for sexually abusing 10 boys over 15 years.

Karl Rominger, who helped defend the 68-year-old retired defensive coach, visited him at the Centre County jail.

“He’s defiant and wants the truth to be told. He wants people to know that he’s not guilty,” Mr. Rominger said.

NEW JERSEY

Plane tows swastika, startles beachgoers

LONG BEACH — A group that claimed responsibility for flying a small plane towing a swastika banner over New Jersey’s shore and New York City over the weekend said the display was not meant as an endorsement of anti-Semitism, but as an attempt to resurrect the symbol’s more benign roots.

The sight startled beachgoers on Saturday afternoon and set Twitter abuzz. A group called the International Raelian Movement, which believes humans were created by extraterrestrials, says it was responsible.

The movement said on its website that the flyover was part of its third annual Swastika Rehabilitation Day. In a statement posted Sunday, the group reiterated its belief that the swastika is actually a symbol of peace and beauty that was corrupted by the Nazis in 20th-century Germany.

OKLAHOMA

3 still missing after head-on train crash

GOODWELL — Two freight trains that collided in an Oklahoma wheat field weren’t blowing their horns or flashing their lights as they hurtled toward each other, according to a long-haul trucker who watched helplessly from a highway as the locomotives collided head-on.

Three of the four crew members assigned to the trains were missing Monday, and investigators feared they couldn’t have survived the crash and tremendous fire.

The accident happened Sunday just after an eastbound Union Pacific train carrying mixed goods from Los Angeles to Chicago passed through the town of Goodwell at a good clip. A mile east of town, it hit a westbound Union Pacific train hauling cars and trucks.

The resulting diesel fireball seemed to merge tons of steel and spewed black smoke that could be seen for miles across the flat, arid landscape. One crew member suffered scrapes and bruises after jumping from the westbound train as it traveled alongside U.S. 54 about eight miles southwest of Guymon.

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