Americans react to historic health care decision

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Name: Bev Veals

Home: Near Wilmington, N.C.

Age: 48

Occupation: Stay-at-home mom of a 17-year-old and a 20-year-old

Insurance coverage: Coverage under the new law for people with pre-existing conditions

On Thursday morning, waiting for the news, Veals was watching CNN, which initially reported incorrectly that the law had been overturned. She was tense with worry that she would lose her coverage.

“I’m totally, absolutely right now dazed because they first, initially said it had been overturned,” Veals said. “I’m sitting here gasping for breath. … Now they’re saying it’s being upheld.” She added: “It’s a relief.”

The expense of her breast cancer treatments led to bankruptcy and foreclosure for her family over a horrific 10-year period. Finally, it cost so much that she could no longer afford health insurance. She and her self-employed husband decided to drop her from the family’s insurance plan four years ago to reduce their monthly premiums from $1,700 to $400 a month.

She spent the next 27 months uninsured. Then in 2011 she signed up for insurance made possible by the new law. The program helps people who have been turned away by insurance companies because of pre-existing medical conditions. She now pays $377 a month for her insurance with a $1,000 deductible, meaning she pays that much out of pocket before the coverage starts.

“It has only been a little over a year for me, but I can’t tell you the dignity being covered brings,” Veals said. “My biggest fear was I would have to beg for help to cover medical bills. Panhandling to pay a doctor’s bill … not my idea of the American Dream.”

Though raised as a Republican, Veals said her politics are changing.

“As a conservative, I believed if you can’t make your way, you don’t get your way. Now I’ve cost more medically than I will ever be able to make. I’ve changed my political stance because of this,” she said. “It doesn’t do our economy any good when we have so many people having to file for medical bankruptcy.”

___

Name: Michael Esch

Home: Warwick, N.Y.

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