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“For Curley, Schultz, Spanier and Paterno, the responsible and ‘humane’ thing to do was, like Governor Corbett, to carefully and responsibly assess the best way to handle vague, but troubling allegations,” the lawyers said. “Faced with tough situations, good people try to do their best to make the right decisions.”

Paterno, ousted by the school’s board of trustees for what was called his “failure of leadership” surrounding allegations against Sandusky, died of lung cancer in January. After Sandusky’s arrest, Paterno said through a spokesman that he reported the allegation to the head of his department and “that was the last time the matter was brought to my attention until this investigation and I assumed that the men I referred it to handled the matter appropriately.”

Sollers, the Paterno family lawyer, said Saturday that Paterno testified truthfully and to the best of his recollection to the grand jury. He said Paterno believed the matter would be “thoroughly and professionally investigated” and that the coach “did not interfere with or attempt to compromise any investigation.”

Schultz, 62, and Curley, 58, deny the allegations and have asked a judge to dismiss the charges. A status conference for their case is scheduled for July 11.

Spanier sued Penn State in May to try to get copies of his email traffic from 1998 to 2004, citing the pending investigation being conducted on the university by former FBI director Louis Freeh. Two weeks ago, lawyers for Penn State asked a judge to throw out the lawsuit and said the attorney general’s office, which is prosecuting Curley and Schultz, had asked them not to provide Spanier with the emails.

In a statement released Saturday night, the school said the public and Penn State will receive the Freeh report at the same time, and that the Board of Trustees and administration will discuss the report when it is issued.