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Margaret Watson, 73, in the crowd near Buckingham Palace on Monday, remembered watching the Coronation on the television set which her family bought especially to watch the event.

“I am here to say thank you to the queen for all she has done,” said Watson, who came to London from Yorkshire with family members. “I am just so pleased to have lived through her reign.”

Others were less happy to have lived through the rain.

“I have run out of dry clothes and my sleeping bag is soaked through. My tent is ruined,” said Chris Wittington, 46, from suburban Essex county, near London. “But apart from that, it has been excellent.”

“Whether you believe in the monarchy or not, this is just fantastic,” said Beverley Clements, 44, who was with 37-year-old sister Harriet Poppleton. “There may not be much to celebrate at the moment, but there is a great sense of Britishness here at the moment.”

Exercising her royal prerogative, the queen is expected to attend only part of the concert.

Elton John is set to perform “Your Song,” “I’m Still Standing” and “Crocodile Rock.” Tom Jones will pose the question, “Why? Why? Why?” in the song “Delilah,” while Annie Lennox will sing “There Must Be An Angel.”

Ska band Madness is expected to perform “Our House” on the palace roof, evoking a similar appearance at a Golden Jubilee concert 10 years ago by Brian May of Queen.

Kylie Minogue and Stevie Wonder will play a medley of greatest hits, and Paul McCartney will play “Live and Let Die,” his James Bond theme. American soprano Renee Fleming will perform with the BBC Concert Orchestra.

The 262 residents of the remote island of Tristan de Cunha, a British territory 1,500 miles (2,400 kilometers) from any other land, are combining their Jubilee beacon with some environmentally conscious gardening. They are lighting their fire with invasive species including the New Zealand Christmas Tree, loganberry and other alien plants.

“You don’t get more patriotic than saving U.K. wildlife on the queen’s Jubilee, so we decided to make the occasion by lighting a beacon made from all the plants we remove,” chief islander Ian Laverollo said.